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Hello, everyone,

1. Since the equipment never arrived so much for using it properly.

2. Since the equipment never arrived so much for proper usage.

3. As the letter in question was never received by this office so much for its delivery to the next prospective recipient.

4. As the letter in question was never received by this office so much for its delivery.

Are "1", "2", and "3" correct?

Thanks.

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Hi, Ahmad,

@ahmad posted:

1. Since the equipment never arrived so much for using it properly.

2. Since the equipment never arrived so much for proper usage.

3. As the letter in question was never received by this office so much for its delivery to the next prospective recipient.

4. As the letter in question was never received by this office so much for its delivery.

Where have you taken those sentences from? They don't make sense.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator
@ahmad posted:

1. Since the equipment never arrived so much for using it properly.

2. Since the equipment never arrived so much for proper usage.

3. As the letter in question was never received by this office so much for its delivery to the next prospective recipient.

4. As the letter in question was never received by this office so much for its delivery.



They don't make sense.

Hi, Ahmad and Gustavo,

The sentences do make sense to me, but only when my mind supplies the comma that is absolutely essential and sorely missing before "so."

Ahmad is using "so much for" in its idiomatic, exclamatory sense (see here). Normally, "so much for" sentences are not introduced by a subordinate clause.

I'd prefer the sentences if each were divided into two separate sentences or into two independent clauses conjoined by a comma and then "so."

5. The equipment never (even) arrived. So much for using it properly!
6. The equipment never (even) arrived; so, so much for using it properly.

Ahmad, I assume you are already aware that idiomatic "so much for" clauses are only appropriate in informal, conversational English.

Last edited by David, Moderator

The sentences do make sense to me, but only when my mind supplies the comma that is absolutely essential and sorely missing before "so."

Ahmad is using "so much for" in its idiomatic, exclamatory sense (see here). Normally, "so much for" sentences are not introduced by a subordinate clause.

I'd prefer the sentences if each were divided into two separate sentences or into two independent clauses conjoined by a comma and then "so."

5. The equipment never (even) arrived. So much for using it properly!
6. The equipment never (even) arrived; so, so much for using it properly.

Ahmad, I assume you are already aware that idiomatic "so much for" clauses are only appropriate in informal, conversational English.

I know that usage, David, but the punctuation was faulty. As written, they made no sense.

Ahmad, I assume you are already aware that idiomatic "so much for" clauses are only appropriate in informal, conversational English.

Hi, David,

I have never used that expression ever before yesterday. In fact, I came across it twice or thrice only in these years, and that is why I wanted to ensure proper usage. Pertinently, I came across some examples (as shown in the image below) after you posted your reply, and I would love to know if the expression under consideration could be used in formal contexts.

So much

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  • So much
@ahmad posted:

Pertinently, I came across some examples (as shown in the image below) after you posted your reply, and I would love to know if the expression under consideration could be used in formal contexts.

So much

No. As I told you, it is only appropriate in informal usage. That doesn't mean you will never encounter it in articles, novels, or plays. If you think that Shakespeare, Scott, and Hardy only wrote formally in their published works, you are quite mistaken. Your objection is without foundation. Moreover, nobody uses it as you have, after a subordinate clause, let alone after one that is not even separated punctuationally from the main clause. That doesn't work at all.

Last edited by David, Moderator
@ahmad posted:

...would you kindly explain why the use of the phrase/expression is incompatible with subordinate clause?

Because typical usage indicates that the speaker says something in one sentence and then, in a separate, independent sentence starting with "so much for" (after a period or a semicolon — and perhaps even an em dash), the speaker comments on the undesired result of what was said at the beginning:

. He’s late again. So much for good intentions. (Example taken from LDOCE)
- Well, it's raining. So much for our perfect weather. (Example taken from Merriam-Webster's)
- The car won't start. So much for our trip to the beach. (Example taken from Cambridge Dictionary)
- Another rise in income tax. So much for all those election promises. (Example taken from Macmillan Dictionary)
- He has spent 19 million pounds, lost three cup finals and been relegated. So much for money. (Example taken from Collins Dictionary)
- The cold and waves were starting to get to me, and I couldn't feel my legs; so much for my lanolin and vaseline mixture. (Example taken from Oxford Lexico dictionary)
She gave the job to the other manager. So much for all her promises to me. (Example taken from the Free Dictionary)

"So much for" can also be used at the beginning to mark the end of something:

- Well, so much for that idea. We'll have to look for a better solution. (Example taken from Merriam-Webster's)
- So much for polite introductions. It’s now time to get down to business. (Example taken from Macmillan Dictionary)
- Well, so much for the producers. But what of the consumers? (Example taken from Collins Dictionary)
- So much for the melodic line. We now turn our attention to the accompaniment. (Example taken from Oxford Lexico dictionary)
- Well, so much for the rule where they're not supposed to address each other directly. (Example taken from Oxford Lexico dictionary)
- So much for the situation in the Far East. Now let’s turn our attention to South America. (Example taken from the Free Dictionary)

Notice that, in all of the examples above, there are no subordinate clauses associated with the "so much for" structure as the ones you used with subordinating conjunctions since and as in the sentences you presented. Not that they are impossible, but they are indeed unusual.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

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