I always see an ending sentence (and some derivatives) on letters like these:

1. Sorry for the inconvenience.
2. Sorry for the inconvenience caused.
3. Sorry for the inconvenience that may have caused to you.

Are these all correct? Is No.2 the best one?

In sentence (3), does it sound proper? I guess it says: I don't think you would have any problem to the mistake made or does it matter at all, but just in case that it causes you any inconvenience, I am sorry for that. Is my interpretation correct?

Thanks.
Momo
Original Post
quote:
1. Sorry for the inconvenience.
2. Sorry for the inconvenience caused.
3. Sorry for the inconvenience that may have caused to you.

Sentences 1) and 2) are correct. Sentence 3) is not correct as is; you would have to say: 'Sorry for the inconvenience that may have been caused to you.

Sentence 1) is very impersonal. It could be on a sign in an area of construction. Sentence 2) is OK, but also impersonal. Sentence 3) (with 'been') is OK for a letter if you want to make it personal. You could also say, as an alternate to sentence 3):

  • We are sorry for the inconvenience this may have caused / may cause (you).
  • Rachel, Moderator posted:
    quote:
    1. Sorry for the inconvenience.
    2. Sorry for the inconvenience caused.
    3. Sorry for the inconvenience that may have caused to you.

    Sentences 1) and 2) are correct. Sentence 3) is not correct as is; you would have to say: 'Sorry for the inconvenience that may have been caused to you.

    Sentence 1) is very impersonal. It could be on a sign in an area of construction. Sentence 2) is OK, but also impersonal. Sentence 3) (with 'been') is OK for a letter if you want to make it personal. You could also say, as an alternate to sentence 3):

    • We are sorry for the inconvenience this may have caused / may cause (you).

    I'm a beginner of English grammar learning.I'm indeed confusing about the alternative sentence you propose that  "We are sorry for the inconvenience this may cause you". What's the construction of this sentence๏ผŸIs "this may cause you "refering to a kind of clauses?especially Why word โ€œyouโ€ has been put on this position? Expect to your answer

    Hello, Emonhenn, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange!

    I will try to explain that sentence to you, but I strongly suggest that you continue studying English without caring too much about grammatical terminology.

    I don't know if you've ever heard about "relative clauses," that is, clauses that modify nouns.

    Instead of saying:

    4. We are sorry for the inconvenience caused.

    we can say:

    5. We are sorry for the inconvenience (that) we may have caused you.

    or, in the passive voice, that is, if you don't want "we" to appear again:

    6. We are sorry for the inconvenience (that) may have been caused to you.

    Sentences 4, 5 and 6 above refer to the past.

    This sentence:

    7. We are sorry for the inconvenience (that) this may cause you.

    refers to the future possibility of some inconvenience affecting "you." "you" is the person who may suffer that inconvenience.

    "that" is between parentheses in all of the sentences above because it is optional.

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