Is the use of the stative verb 'hear' in the continuous form correct in the following example, and if so - what is the rule that allows it? 
'Has Bob heard the news?'
'He's just been called to the principal's office and he's probably hearing the news as we speak.'

Original Post

Hi, Gideon, and welcome to the G.E,

Gideon posted:

Is the use of the stative verb 'hear' in the continuous form correct in the following example, and if so - what is the rule that allows it? 
'Has Bob heard the news?'
'He's just been called to the principal's office and he's probably hearing the news as we speak.'

IMO, the progressive tense is acceptable here. According to 'LDOCE' and according to the editor of Longman Website, when 'hear' means 'to be told something', it is sometimes -though not often- used in the progressive.

- I have been hearing / have heard good things about your work. (An example from the previous Longman Website). 

This explanation applies to your question above.

___________________________________________________________________________________

Quirk in 'A COMPREHENSIVE GRAMMAR OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE' says:

"Note the exceptional use of see and hear with the progressive (focusing on the process of perception) in:
1. I need some spectacles. I'm not seeing things so well these days.
2. A: Did you hear a bell ring just then?
B: No. I can't hear a thing.
A: There it goes again! l am hearing it now. (I can hear it now).

___________________________________________________________________________________

  Grammatically speaking, 'hear' is actually used in the progressive when it means 'to imagine sounds'.

- There is no one there. I must be hearing things. (On LDOCE).

However, when 'hear' means 'to know that a sound is being made using your ears', it isn't used in the progressive and the progressive meaning could be indicated by preceding it by 'can/could'.

- She heard him singing. 

Gideon posted:

Incidentally, though, this example doesn't sound right to me:
There it goes again! l am hearing it now.
I would say: There it goes again!  I hear it now.

I think it is correct, but unusual. I know that Quirk here means that the progressive arises from perception being treated as an ongoing process, but this may be an American take, not British. I see (l can hear it now) is much better and more usual than (I am hearing it now) .

ahmed_btm posted:
Gideon posted:

Incidentally, though, this example doesn't sound right to me:
There it goes again! l am hearing it now.
I would say: There it goes again!  I hear it now.

I think it is correct, but unusual. I know that Quirk here means that the progressive arises from perception being treated as an ongoing process, but this may be an American take, not British. I see (l can hear it now) is much better and more usual than (I am hearing it now) .

Thanks for the Quirk et al. (1985) quote, Ahmed, but please remember to cite the page number and/or the section number, so that someone can find it easily, without flipping through eighteen hundred pages. Also, please note that Randolph Quirk did not author the book alone but with three other linguists.

I was able to find your quotation in a footnote on page 205, at the end of section 4.30. There is no indication that this progressive usage of hear is especially American, nor that it is inferior. It is simply exceptional, and the reason for the exceptional usage is manifest in the quotation.

In the quotation, we are not presented with I am hearing it now as a sentence in isolation, but rather as the fifth sentence in a conversation in which two speakers are discussing the intermittent ringing of a bell. The progressive is naturally used in this context in order to represent the sound perception as temporary.

I recently joined your website. And I must admit I find this forum quite informative. I am preparing for SAT and I have got a long way to go. Just a quick clarification because I need to have an insight into such topics. If someone asks me "Do I have an extra pack of chips?" I would generally say " I've got some or Here, I've got you. or something like that" However to be more grammatically correct and obviously considering the threads' topic which reply is correct one.

I have a pack of chips.

I having a pack of chips.

And if you could please add distinction in your answer as if the reply is a part of a conversation & also as an answer to a question or a request. Thanks!

 

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