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@Cristi posted:

Which one is more correct? In or on

e.g.

Are you happy for me to get the notice to be printed and sticked in or on the lift?

Hi, Cristi—The sentence sounds thoroughly nonnative, and your use of "to be" is incorrect. Unless you have a special reason to use "sticked," as a term of technical jargon, the normal past participle of "stick" is "stuck." You can say:

  • Would you like me to get the notice printed and stuck on the lift?

Both "in" and "on" are OK. You need to think about what the sentence is supposed to mean. If the sticker is being stuck in something, use "in"; if it is being stuck on something, use "on."

Thanks David, but I checked this website and apparently the past participle for stick can be "sticked" (regular verb) or stuck for irregular verb.



Find the Past Tense find it Antonyms Definitiors Rhymes Sentences Word What is the past tense of stick? lA)hoEs the past tense of stick? Here's the word you're looking for. Answer The past tense of stick is sticked or stuck. The third-person singular simple present indicative form of stick is sticks. The present participle of stick is sticking. The past participle of stick is sticked or stuck. 4))

So lift consists of three sides, I suppose to mean it gets sticked on any of the three sides, but I was also concerned if I use "on", it can imply the lift top. Appreciate if you could shed some light

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  • Stick

I'm aware that the word "sticked" exists, Cristi, but I am recommending that you used "stuck" if you wish your English to sound natural. I never hear anyone use "sticked," and my computer even underlines it as incorrect. I am informing you that STUCK is the best word to use.

@Cristi posted:

So lift consists of three sides, I suppose to mean it gets sticked on any of the three sides, but I was also concerned if I use "on", it can imply the lift top. Appreciate if you could shed some light

"Lift consists of three sides." Why are you not using "the"? What do you mean by "I suppose to mean"? "On" can be used for sticking something on the exterior; it doesn't. If an English speaker wanted to speaking of sticking something on top of something else, he would use "on top of."

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