take a walk

kuen posted:

What's the difference between  go walking, go for a walk, go and walk and take a walk? When can I use these expressions?

Hi, Kuen,

When you wish to refer to words as words, or to phrases as phrases, it is good to place them between quotation marks or in italics.

You can use "go walking," "go for a walk," "go and walk," and "take a walk" fairly interchangeably; however, "go and walk" sounds rather unlikely to me.

We usually use "go and [verb]" when "go [verb]" can also be used, informally. We generally say "go walking/run" rather than "go walk/run." But both are OK.

David, Moderator posted:

 however, "go and walk" sounds rather unlikely to me.

We usually use "go and [verb]" when "go [verb]" can also be used, informally. We generally say "go walking/run" rather than "go walk/run." But both are OK.

Hi David,

What do you mean when you said "go and walk" sounds rather unlikely to me."?

And do you mean it's also correct to say "go run"and "go walk"? Can we say 'go fish' and 'go swim' etc. when talking about outdoor activities?

Thank you very much for your answer.

 

kuen posted:
What do you mean when you said "go and walk" sounds rather unlikely to me."?

Hello again, Kuen,

When I said that "go and walk" sounded rather unlikely to me, I meant that, as a native speaker of English, I would be rather unlikely to use it that I think it would be rather unlikely for other native speakers of English to use it, too.

kuen posted:
And do you mean it's also correct to say "go run"and "go walk"? Can we say 'go fish' and 'go swim' etc. when talking about outdoor activities?

Yes, it is correct, but "go [verb phrase]" tends mainly to be used in informal English. So if you are writing to the Queen of England, you might want to formulate things differently. In normal conversational English, it's fine.

Also, in both "go and [verb phrase] and "go [verb phrase]," the reference is to the situation as a whole, whereas, in "go V-ing," the meaning is essentially progressive; what's referred to is the middle of the situation (the activity itself).

If I were to use "go and walk" or "go walk," there would be more to the verb phrase following "go" than simply "walk." I might say, for example, "I am going to go and walk a mile" or "I need some exercise. I think I'll go walk a mile."

With "go V-ing," the "V-ing" can't include a direct object. It is ungrammatical to say, *"I am going to go walking a mile." So if you're looking for something grammatically incorrect, Kuen, that is an excellent example.

kuen posted:

Do these expressions below also sound rather unlikely to you or is it case-by-case?

"go and hike"/"go hike"

"go and ski"/ "go ski"

"go and shop"/ "go shop"

"go and ride" / "go ride" etc.

Thank you very much for your explanation.

Yes, they also sound rather unlikely to me, and, no, it is not a case-by-case thing.  You can apply the explanation I gave you in my last post to any of the limited number of phrases that we use "go V-ing" with.

While it is grammatically acceptable to use "go and shop" or "go shop," if one wishes to focus solely on the type of activity, it is more natural to use "go shopping" (go swimming, go hiking, go skiing, go hunting, etc.).

Again, as I have already explained to you, "go and hike" and "go shop" (insert whatever verb you want) refers to the whole situation, not merely to the activity after it has begun. E.g.: "They are going to go (and) hike Mt. Kilimanjaro."

But that doesn't mean that people never would say, simply, "go hike," "go fish," etc. Indeed there is even a card game called "Go Fish," as you can see in the image below.

Go-Fish

When one card player another to "go fish," the meaning is not "go fishing." "Go fish" is a command to draw a card from "the pool." It refers to one complete action, not to an activity. Below is a play on words, which I won't explain to you.

fish yourself

Attachments

Photos (2)

Hi David,

Are these sentences  correct?

1. "I need some exercise. I think I'll go to  walk a mile."

2. "I need some exercise. I think I'll go to walk."

3. Let's go to shop/ hike/ fish.

4. Let's go to shop in the store.

5. I am going to go to hike in the woods tomorrow morning.

 

Thank you very much for your great help.

Kuen, what you need to understand is what David explained when, in reference to the structure "go (and) infinitive", he said something as simple and clear as:

It refers to one complete action, not to an activity.

I think your sentences 1 to 5 above are not grammatically incorrect but, since some of the infinitives following the verb go indicate activities (a continued action) rather than individual actions that can be viewed as having a beginning and an end, the gerund would be more usual. I find these sentences more likely if you wish to use the infinitive:

1'. I need some exercise. I think I'll walk a mile.

2'. I need some exercise. I think I'll walk (instead of taking a taxi).

3'. Let's shop/ hike/ fish.

4'. Let's shop in the store.

5'. I am going to hike in the woods tomorrow morning.

Hi, GUSTAVO,

I can understand what you mean in your post above. Do these verbs like 'walk', 'shop', etc. in these sentences you wrote below refer to one complete action?

Thank you very much for your help.

Gustavo, Contributor posted:

1'. I need some exercise. I think I'll walk a mile.

2'. I need some exercise. I think I'll walk (instead of taking a taxi).

3'. Let's shop/ hike/ fish.

4'. Let's shop in the store.

5'. I am going to hike in the woods tomorrow morning.

 

kuen posted:

Do these verbs like 'walk', 'shop', etc. in these sentences you wrote below refer to one complete action?

Yes, they are thought of as actions that have a beginning and an end. The clearest examples are (1') and (2'). As David told you, you cannot say:

*I'll go walking a mile.

In (2'), the walk has a starting point (the place you are leaving) and an end: your home.

These examples show the difference very clearly, as I see them:

6. I don't know what to do this afternoon. Perhaps I'll go shopping (a long activity with no foreseeable or set end).

7. Today's my friend's birthday. I'll go (and) buy him a present (one complete action).

kuen posted:

Hi, GUSTAVO,

Hi, Kuen,

Please do not spell Gustavo's name with all caps. If you are imitating the way his name displays at the top of his posts, consider that my name also displays that way, as does yours, yet you have not addressed me as DAVID, just as I have not addressed you as KUEN. The website's use of all caps at the top of each post is an unfortunate inherent feature of this platform. Thanks for understanding.

kuen posted:

1. What's the difference between 'go on a  hike', 'go for a hike' and 'go hiking'?

English speakers use all three expressions interchangeably.

kuen posted:
2. Could you please give me an example of 'let's shop' with context?

A: I see we've both decided to take advantage of the Black Friday sales.
B: Yeah. I should be asleep right now, but I don't want to miss out on these deals.
A: Oh, look! They're opening the doors now.
B: Finally! Let's shop.

Hi David,

According to your example, it seems that  A and B are right in front of the store when they have the conversation , right?

"Please do not spell Gustavo's name with all caps."

I'm sorry I didn't notice this and thank you for your correction.

Thank you very much again for your help.

kuen posted:

According to your example, it seems that  A and B are right in front of the store when they have the conversation , right?

Yes, that's right, Kuen. They are in front of the store waiting for the store to open. When it opens, one of them says, "Let's shop." It's similar to the use of "Let's eat" shortly after a meal has been served.

David, Moderator posted:
A: I see we've both decided to take advantage of the Black Friday sales.

B: Yeah. I should be asleep right now, but I don't want to miss out on these deals.
A: Oh, look! They're opening the doors now.
B: Finally! Let's shop.

Hi David,

I'm still not sure if I can use these expressions below instead of "Let's shop" in the context you gave above. So do they also sound natural here?

"Let's go shopping"

"Let's go (and) shop"

Thank you very much for your helpful answer.

 

 

 

kuen posted:
I'm still not sure if I can use these expressions below instead of "Let's shop" in the context you gave above. So do they also sound natural here?

"Let's go shopping"

"Let's go (and) shop"

No, Kuen. It is not natural to use "go V-ing" or "go (and) [verb ]" when one doesn't need to go anywhere to do whatever it is one is talking about. You won't find native speakers saying, "Let's go surfing" if they're already in the water lying on their surfboards, or "Let's go bowling" if they're already at the bowling alley, or "Let's go ice skating" if they're already at an ice skating rink with their ice skates on, or "Let's go hunting" if they're already in the woods with their rifles, or "Let's go fishing" if they're on the lake with their fishing poles at the ready.

Hi David,

I have a question about 'taking a walk'. Here is an example:

A runs into B in a park one day and A asks B what he is doing in the park and then B answers A: I'm taking a walk around the park.

Is it correct to use 'taking a walk' here or should I say 'I'm walking around the park'?

Thank you very much for your help.

kuen posted:
A runs into B in a park one day and A asks B what he is doing in the park and then B answers A: I'm taking a walk around the park.

Is it correct to use 'taking a walk' here or should I say 'I'm walking around the park'?

Either sentence can be used there, Kuen. Both of them work and are correct.

David, Moderator posted:
kuen posted:
I'm still not sure if I can use these expressions below instead of "Let's shop" in the context you gave above. So do they also sound natural here?

"Let's go shopping"

"Let's go (and) shop"

No, Kuen. It is not natural to use "go V-ing" or "go (and) [verb ]" when one doesn't need to go anywhere to do whatever it is one is talking about. You won't find native speakers saying, "Let's go surfing" if they're already in the water lying on their surfboards, or "Let's go bowling" if they're already at the bowling alley, or "Let's go ice skating" if they're already at an ice skating rink with their ice skates on, or "Let's go hunting" if they're already in the woods with their rifles, or "Let's go fishing" if they're on the lake with their fishing poles at the ready.

Hi David,

If they're not already in the water lying on their surfboards yet and still sitting on the beach, in this context, can I say

1. Let's go surfing or

2. Let's go and surf or

3. Let's go surf or

4. Let's go for a swim or

5. Let's surf.

Thank you  very much.

 

kuen posted:
If they're not already in the water lying on their surfboards yet and still sitting on the beach, in this context, can I say

1. Let's go surfing or

2. Let's go and surf or

3. Let's go surf or

4. Let's go for a swim or

5. Let's surf.

Hi, Kuen: Have these people sitting on the sand come to the beach with the intention of surfing, or does the speaker mean to suggest something that they hadn't thought of doing already? When you can answer that question, tell me what you think the answer to your question is.

P.S. In English, sentences end with a period. They never end with "or."

David, Moderator posted:
 

Hi, Kuen: Have these people sitting on the sand come to the beach with the intention of surfing, or does the speaker mean to suggest something that they hadn't thought of doing already? When you can answer that question, tell me what you think the answer to your question is.

P.S. In English, sentences end with a period. They never end with "or."

Hi David,

I am very sorry that my question confused you. I meant that these people sitting on the sand have come to the beach with the intention of surfing. I think all the options from #1 to #5 are possible. Am I right?

Could you please also tell me what the answer would be in the other situation you mentioned in your last post if the speaker mean to suggest something that they hadn't thought of doing already?

Thank you very much for your correction and help.

kuen posted:
David, Moderator posted:
 

Hi, Kuen: Have these people sitting on the sand come to the beach with the intention of surfing, or does the speaker mean to suggest something that they hadn't thought of doing already? When you can answer that question, tell me what you think the answer to your question is.

P.S. In English, sentences end with a period. They never end with "or."

Hi David,

I am very sorry that my question confused you. I meant that these people sitting on the sand have come to the beach with the intention of surfing. I think all the options from #1 to #5 are possible. Am I right?

Could you please also tell me what the answer would be in the other situation you mentioned in your last post if the speaker mean to suggest something that they hadn't thought of doing already?

Thank you very much for your correction and help.

Hi, Kuen: Your question didn't confuse me. I simply wanted you to think about what you were asking. Since you have said that they have come to the beach with the intention of surfing, it would be very strange for one of them to say, "Let's go surfing" while sitting on the sand. That is because they are already, while sitting on the sand, in the act of going surfing. The other options are less unnatural. If you would like to say something natural in that context, you could try these:

  • Are you ready to surf?
  • Shall we get in the water?
  • I'm ready to go in. How about you?
David, Moderator posted:
kuen posted:
If they're not already in the water lying on their surfboards yet and still sitting on the beach, in this context, can I say

1. Let's go surfing or

2. Let's go and surf or

3. Let's go surf or

4. Let's go for a swim or

5. Let's surf.

Hi, Kuen: Have these people sitting on the sand come to the beach with the intention of surfing, or does the speaker mean to suggest something that they hadn't thought of doing already? When you can answer that question, tell me what you think the answer to your question is.

P.S. In English, sentences end with a period. They never end with "or."

Hi David,

If the speaker means to suggest something that they hadn't thought of doing already (without planning ahead) when they are on the beach? Which expressions below are correct to be used here?

1. Let's go swimming.

2. Let's go and swim.

3. Let's go swim

4. Let's go to swim.

5. Let's go for a swim.

Thank you very much.

 

 

kuen posted:
If the speaker means to suggest something that they hadn't thought of doing already (without planning ahead) when they are on the beach? Which expressions below are correct to be used here?

1. Let's go swimming.

2. Let's go and swim.

3. Let's go swim

4. Let's go to swim.

5. Let's go for a swim.

Hi, Kuen: In that context, all five of those sentences are OK; however, I would never say (4). It's grammatical, but it sounds strange to me there, and I can't imagine using it or hearing any other native speaker use it in that context.

Since this is becoming a never-ending discussion, Kuen, would you mind telling me what your particular interest is in these "go"-constructions? Are you doing a research project for a university? Do you hope to write a book on them? Thanks.

David, Moderator posted:

 

Since this is becoming a never-ending discussion, Kuen, would you mind telling me what your particular interest is in these "go"-constructions? Are you doing a research project for a university? Do you hope to write a book on them? Thanks.

Hi David,

First of all, thank you for being patient and making an effort to keep all my questions solved. You have been very helpful! And as for your questions above: Neither. I just hope that I can learn more correct  and natural English rather than poor English.

 

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×