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I was asked to talk about some mistakes Teachers make that make them less effective. While answering I said:

"Teachers often fail to acknowledge the unique needs of each and every student. As if he's the shepherd and the students are his flock of sheep."

Is it possible to say this or 'teach students like a flock of sheep' to mean that teachers treat students as if they all have the same capacity?

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Hi, Ashraful—I agree with Dorothy that the image of a shepherd tending to his flock is not naturally perceived as being negative. Indeed, the shepherd is generally understood to be a person who tends to the unique needs of the sheep under his care. Sheep may look similar to each other, but each one has different needs and levels of capability. The shepherd tends to all.

Hi, Ashraful—I agree with Dorothy that the image of a shepherd tending to his flock is not naturally perceived as being negative. Indeed, the shepherd is generally understood to be a person who tends to the unique needs of the sheep under his care. Sheep may look similar to each other, but each one has different needs and levels of capability. The shepherd tends to all.

Thank you. How about 'puppets and puppeteers?' Since the puppeteer  controls the puppets? 

First of all, English is not my native language... In my humble opinion, the concept of "puppets and puppeteers" has a negative connotation. For puppets are completely "controlled" by the puppeteers. In other words, in a way, there is a kind of  "master and slave"  relationship here where puppets can only act in accordance with the will of their puppeteers/masters.

I would personally not use the analogy of " shepherd and flock".  This analogy is quite often used  in the context of religion by the Manifestations/Messengers of God, like Christ, where the "flock" completely submit themselves to their " shepherd" believing that he (i.e. the shepherd) is from God and therefore is infallible, which is not the case with a "teacher".

@Peace posted:

I would personally not use the analogy of " shepherd and flock".  This analogy is quite often used  in the context of religion by the Manifestations/Messengers of God, like Christ, where the "flock" completely submit themselves to their " shepherd" believing that he (i.e. the shepherd) is from God and therefore is infallible, which is not the case with a "teacher".

Thanks for the answer. I really want to give an example like this after finishing my statement about how some teachers don't acknowledge that every student has the same capacity.

Can you think of one?

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