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Hi, Jacob,

@Jacob B. posted:

"You must provide written verification that describes the domestic violence services provided to the client, and that describes the incidents of domestic violence the client experienced."

You will no doubt agree that, with both relative clauses sharing the same verb, it would be much better to say:

- You must provide written verification that describes the domestic violence services provided to the client and/as well as the incidents of domestic violence the client experienced/experienced by him/her.

With a different verb, the comma may be optional, but I would tend to omit it to preserve the restrictive nature of the clauses:

- You must provide written verification that describes the domestic violence services provided to the client and that specifies the incidents of domestic violence the client experienced.

In this case, however, I would use reduced relatives, which flow much better:

- You must provide written verification describing the domestic violence services provided to the client and specifying the incidents of domestic violence the client experienced.

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor


With a different verb, the comma may be optional, but I would tend to omit it to preserve the restrictive nature of the clauses:

- You must provide written verification that describes the domestic violence services provided to the client and that specifies the incidents of domestic violence the client experienced.



Hi, Jacob—I agree with Gustavo's answer, especially with his point that the verbs should be changed if you want to modify "written verification" with two conjoined relative clauses.

When using conjoined relative clauses, I generally use wh-relative pronouns. In this case, I would use "which." "That" can be misread as beginning a new independent clause.

  • You must provide written verification which describes the domestic violence services provided to the client and which specifies the incidents of domestic violence the client experienced.

Don't worry about beginning restrictive relative clauses with "which." Anyone who tells you it is wrong to do so is mistaken. "Which" has been beginning restrictive relative clauses in prose of the highest quality for centuries.

Last edited by David, Moderator

Hi, Jacob,

You will no doubt agree that, with both relative clauses sharing the same verb, it would be much better to say:

- You must provide written verification that describes the domestic violence services provided to the client and/as well as the incidents of domestic violence the client experienced/experienced by him/her.

With a different verb, the comma may be optional, but I would tend to omit it to preserve the restrictive nature of the clauses:

- You must provide written verification that describes the domestic violence services provided to the client and that specifies the incidents of domestic violence the client experienced.

If the clauses share the same verb but are non-restrictive, would you add a comma before "and/as well"?

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