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Hello, everyone,

“One of the most frequent problems in groupwork is that not everyone puts the same amount of effort into the task. Group members may have a different work ethic or standards for the quality of their work, and this will probably result in different levels of commitment to the group work. While different levels of commitment to the task could be partly influenced by individual workloads, there are wider factors such as individual attitudes to study.  Another aspect of the same problem, however, is where one member chooses to do more work than the others. An overeager member can be irritating to the other members who then reduce their commitment to the work leaving the overeager member to get on with most of the work.”

When I rewrite the underlined part above into “Another aspect of the same problem is the case where (or, ‘in which’) one member chooses to do more work than the others.”, my question is as follows;

1) is it right that the seemingly proceding noun – ‘the case’ has been dropped in this 'formal' sentence?

2) if so, can such proceding nouns as ‘the case, situation, circumstance, point, etc.’ (not ‘place’) be often dropped in informal style only, while I remember Swan wrote in 'Practical English Usage', 3rd edition, page.498 ”After common nouns referring to time, ‘when’ is often replaced by ‘that’ or dropped in an informal style. The same thing happens with ‘where’ after ‘somewhere, anywhere, everywhere, nowhere and place’ (but not after other words).

Your reply would be much appreciated.

*source;

https://books.google.co.kr/boo...where%22&f=false

Last edited by deepcosmos
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Hi, Deepcosmos,

@deepcosmos posted:

Another aspect of the same problem, however, is where one member chooses to do more work than the others. [...]

When I rewrite the underlined part above into “Another aspect of the same problem is the case where (or, ‘in which’) one member chooses to do more work than the others.”, my question is as follows;

1) is it right that the seemingly preceding noun – ‘the case’ has been dropped in this 'formal' sentence?

I think you feel a noun is required because of the presence of the copula. The sentence is acceptable but I personally don't like the verb "be" because the "where"-clause is, in my opinion, adverbial. The presence of the copula led you to insert "the case" (another aspect is this case), but I think the sentence would be better if another verb were used. Since this "where" is temporal rather than locative, "when" would be more appropriate with another verb :

- Another aspect of the same problem arises/becomes evident when one member chooses to do more work than the others.

My impression is that, unless the "wh"-clause that follows "be" is an embedded question (in which case the "wh"-word can be stressed), "be" will not be the best choice. Compare:

- The question is when (can be stressed) one member chooses to do more work than the others. (The question is when it is that one member chooses to do more work than the others.)

- The problem is when (unstressed, problem=difficulty) one member chooses to do more than the others. (Adverbial meaning: The problem arises when ...)

@deepcosmos posted:

2) if so, can such preceding nouns as ‘the case, situation, circumstance, point, etc.’ (not ‘place’) be often dropped in informal style only, while I remember Swan wrote in 'Practical English Usage', 3rd edition, page.498 ”After common nouns referring to time, ‘when’ is often replaced by ‘that’ or dropped in an informal style. The same thing happens with ‘where’ after ‘somewhere, anywhere, everywhere, nowhere and place’ (but not after other words).

I think you have misread Swan. He refers to the omission of "when" (or "that") and your doubt was originally related to the omission of a preceding noun.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

I think you feel a noun is required because of the presence of the copula.

Hi, Gustavo, you've pointed out exactly what I felt.

The sentence is acceptable but I personally don't like the verb "be" because the "where"-clause is, in my opinion, adverbial. The presence of the copula led you to insert "the case" (another aspect is this case), but I think the sentence would be better if another verb were used. Since this "where" is temporal rather than locative, "when" would be more appropriate with another verb :

- Another aspect of the same problem arises/becomes evident when one member chooses to do more work than the others.



Now, your wonderful explanation has made this sentence become fully cleared. Though I doubted somewhat this 'when' in 'is when' might be an interrogative, I wasn't able to continue to do due to this powerful 'is'.



I think you have misread Swan. He refers to the omission of "when" (or "that") and your doubt was originally related to the omission of a preceding noun.

Right, that's exactly what I was confused. Today I feel it is really like learning from private tutor. Thanks a million, Gustavo!

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