Hi!  I have some questions about this sentence:

 

Thus, while those with skills in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) observe higher incomes than those with other backgrounds, the economy is much larger and diverse than this sector.  https://edwp.educ.msu.edu/gree...-and-the-stem-craze/

 

I suppose, prescriptively speaking, there should be "more" in front of "diverse" so that "and" can connect the two comparative degree adjectives, "larger" and "more diverse," but for some reason "more" is omitted.

 

I was wondering about this sentence.  How acceptable/grammatical would you think it would be?  Would there be any semantic difference when "more" is present/absent?  Would it be common to find this kind of sentence?

 

I would very much appreciate your comments!

 

Original Post
yasukotta posted:
I was wondering about this sentence.  How acceptable/grammatical would you think it would be?  Would there be any semantic difference when "more" is present/absent?  Would it be common to find this kind of sentence?

Hi, Yasukotta,

"Much larger and diverse than" is ungrammatical.

Without "more," the sentence doesn't work.

The writer made a mistake.

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