Hello!

I have a question about grammar; is the following sentence grammatically wrong?

"I live in the same building with some native workers" instead of "I live in the same building as some native workers."

Thank you in advance.

Oznel

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Original Post
"I live in the same building as some native workers" is correct.

In addition, your sentence, "I live in the same building with some native workers" could be correct if it appeared in a conversation and everybody knew which building the speaker is referring to:

A: So you live in the Maple Street Apartments too? So does Jack.
B: I know. I live in the same building (as Jack / that Jack lives in) ...with some native workers.
_______
A complete comparison with "the same" would have as before a noun or pronoun:
Your house looks the same as ours.
The climate in Havana is the same as the climate in Miami.
I live in the same building as some native workers.

A comparison would have that before a clause, or possibly who. From Practical English Grammar*:

"Before a clause, ˜the same....that' or ˜the same...who' can be used:

That's the same man that/who asked my for money yesterday

˜As' is also possible before a clause, especially with a noun that is the object of the following verb. There is no difference of meaning between ˜the same that' and ˜the same....as' in this case:

He was wearing the same shirt that/as he'd had on the day before.

˜As/ who/ that' can be left out when they refer to the object of the following verb:

He was wearing the same shirt he'd had on the day before"
_____
Your sentence: "I live in the same building as some native workers" is correct, as is "I live in the same building that some native workers live in." The sentence "I live in the same building with some native workers" might alsobe correct if it has already been established in the conversation "the same building as who?" For this sentence with "with," there would probably be a pause in the speech:

"Yes! I live in the same building.....with some native workers."

Rachel
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*Practical English Usage, Second edition, by Michael Swan. Oxford University Press.1995
An addendum to Rachel's posting:

I've found a significant number of examples of "the same...with." It seems to be a very prevalent construction. Here are just a few, from a Google search.


I couldn't stand being in the same building with some of them, knowing what they did the rest of the week.

Or perhaps she had known the other woman before and wanted to be in the same class with her friend.

Sign up to be in the same [skiing] class with a friend of the same discipline, age and ability level by filling out the "Please put me in the same class with" section of the registration form. Every effort will be made to accommodate reasonable requests

In fact, MDs who are members of the obligatory health insurances cannot work in the same office with a lay health practitioner.


In addition to the preposition with, I've found examples (not many) of alongside:

Brian Barkowski has worked in the same office alongside Schackow for four years.

For the English-speaking student who receive [sic] instruction in the same classroom alongside the Spanish speakers, this is a foreign language immersion program

Although this construction may not be recognized by grammar books (I don't know whether it is discussed or not), it seems to fill a need for English speakers.

Marilyn Martin

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