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1. This is the same car that you bought me. (Does it mean only one car exists?)
2. This is the same car as the one you bought me. (Does it indicate
to two cars? One is the current one we are looking at, and the other is one you bought me?)
3. This car is the same as mine. (Is it correct? Does it indicate to two  cars?)
4. This is the same car as you bought me. (Is it correct? Does it indicate to only one car?)
 
All the followings options confused me. All they mean same to me. I cannot decide how they differ from each other. Is it possible to explain which options among the followings are correct, and how correct options differ from each other in terms of meaning?
 
a) This car is the same one that you bought me.
b) This car is the same that you bought me (one is omitted).
c) This car is the same one you bought me (that is omitted).
d) This is the same car you bought me (one that is omitted).
e) This is the same car as you bought me (as has been used instead of one that).
f) This car is the same as you bought me (Verb order is changed).
 
Now I need to change the subject.
  • He has the same car as me.
  • He has the same car as I do.
  • His car is the same as mine.

Are these three options equally correct?

Last edited by Nousher Ahmed
Original Post

Additionally to the answer you got somewhere else, . . . .

Assuming "somewhere else" is where I think it is, I must take issue with a point that was made in the most celebrated answer. It is asserted that Nousher's fourth example, "This is the same car as you bought me," is "not felicitous as written" but "could be rewritten" as either "This is the same car (that) you bought me" or "This is the same car as the one you bought me."

There is nothing wrong with the sentence "This is the same car as you bought me." It is not infelicitous as written and does not need to be rewritten in either of the ways suggested, though it is perfectly acceptable to do so. That a comparative structure introduced by "the same [noun]" can be directly followed by an "as"-clause has been well documented in grammar books—e.g.:

Quote A:

"As is possible before a clause, especially with a noun that is the object of the following verb.

He's wearing the same shirt that/as he had on yesterday."

- Swan, Michael. Practical English Usage (3rd Ed.), section 503.2. Oxford University Press, 2005.

Quote B:

"As has the function of a relative after the adjectives such and same, and is used to refer to persons, animals, or things.

14. I have the same place as my father held."

- House and Harman, Descriptive English Grammar (2nd Ed.), p. 357. Prentice Hall, 1950.

Quote C:

"As as a relative pronoun. As used after such and same may for convenience be regarded as a relative pronoun, roughly the equivalent of who or which. . . .

He has the same faults as his brother has. [That is, 'He has the same faults which his brother has']"

- Pence & Emery, A Grammar of Present-Day English (2nd Ed.), p. 226. Macmillan, 1926.

Quote D:

"In restrictive relative clauses, as will only be found after NPs involving same or such and after as or so followed by an adjective or adverb. . . . Note that it is not impossible to use that after same, but it is considered better English to use as.

e.g. You're making the same mistake as/(that) you made last time."

- Declerck, Renaat, A Comprehensive Descriptive Grammar of English, p. 545. Kaitakusha, 1991.

Quote E:

"The conjunction as is used to introduce adnominal clauses which denote the particulars referred to by the determinative pronouns same and such, as in:

He offered me the same conditions as he offered you.
I don't admire such books as he writes."

- Poutsma, Hendrik. A Grammar of Late Modern English, Vol. 2, p. 647. P. Noordhoff, Groningen, 1929.

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