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Hello, Diana and Mr. Ahmed!

May I say my point of view?

As Mr. Ahmed_btm said, "value" should be uncountable after "of".

1. These benefits are of important value.

‘of’ is stating that benefits possess important value.


Your sentence could be written in other two ways:

2. These benefits have important value.

3. These benefits are valuable.


There's another one, but it has a different meaning:


4. These benefits are important values.

(1, 2 and 3 are saying that the benefits have important value, whereas 4 is saying that the benefits themselves are the important values).

Last edited by Hussein Hassan
@Diana Gaus posted:

I found a sentence like this: These benefits are of important values.

I was wondering why there should be 'of' after are?

Hello, Diana, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

Where did you find the sentence in question? Can you provide a link to the passage that contains it? The sentence is not necessarily incorrect, but we need context in order to tell whether the possible meaning is the intended one.

@ahmed_btm posted:

I see that the sentence above is grammatically wrong. 'Be' of + a noun phrase is equivalent to 'be' + adj. 'Value' in this structure is used as an uncountable noun.

As I said above, the sentence is not necessarily incorrect. "Values" could indeed be intended as a count noun here. To help you and Hussein see the possible meaning of the sentence as written, consider these related sentences:

(i) These are pictures of important buildings.
(ii) These pictures are of important buildings.

Thus, IF the intended meaning of "These benefits are of important values" is that there are benefits associated with certain important values, and some of those benefits are present (perhaps on a list), the sentence works.

That's why I say we need context.

Last edited by David, Moderator


Thus, IF the intended meaning of "These benefits are of important values" is that there are benefits associated with certain important values, and some of those benefits are present (perhaps on a list), the sentence works.

That's why I say we need context.

Hi, David! How are you?

Look at the following sentence (excerpted from OLAD):



The arrival of canals was of great value to many industries.

Can we use "values" here? Or the sentence has a specific context in which we cannot use the countable, plural noun?

Look at the following sentence (excerpted from OLAD):

The arrival of canals was of great value to many industries.

Can we use "values" here? Or the sentence has a specific context in which we cannot use the countable, plural noun?

Hi, Hussein—In that sentence, which is equivalent in meaning to "The arrival of canals was very valuable to many industries," "value" must indeed be used as a noncount noun. Note that your example is very different from the OP's.

Last edited by David, Moderator

Hi Ahmed, Hussein, and David

Thank you for your answers. @David : I found the sentence in a dissertation of a PhD student. The complete sentence is like the following:

'The positive externalities and non-financial are overlooked by students and institutions at their consideration, yet these benefits are of important values and needed by society and the students themselves'.

My next question is:

Is there a specific condition where the sentence: 'are of important values' needed  rather than these benefits have important values? what about the sentence like "  This may be of your interest', why not this may be your interest.

Thank you

@Diana Gaus posted:

Thank you for your answers. @David : I found the sentence in a dissertation of a PhD student. The complete sentence is like the following:

'The positive externalities and non-financial are overlooked by students and institutions at their consideration, yet these benefits are of important values and needed by society and the students themselves'.



Hi, Diana—Is the Ph.D. student who wrote this a nonnative speaker of English? The opening  coordinate structure ("the positive externalities and non-financial") does not work: we don't coordinate noun phrases with adjectives (e.g., "the apple and yellow").

Also, I'm not sure what "at their consideration" is supposed to mean. Does "their" refer to "students and institutions"? In any case, despite the fact that seeing the whole sentence gives me little idea as to what the author is trying to say, it appears that he or she does mean to say "are of great value."

@Diana Gaus posted:

Is there a specific condition where the sentence: 'are of important values' needed  rather than these benefits have important values? what about the sentence like "  This may be of your interest', why not this may be your interest.

"Are of important values" is a phrase, not a sentence. As I indicated in my last post, "these benefits are of important values" could be used in a context in which benefits of a certain type were being discussed, namely, benefits which important values have. For example, a benefit of the value of honesty (i.e., of having honesty as a value) is the absence of deception and the evils thereof.

Last edited by David, Moderator

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