Hi,

When I think President , I think figurehead; someone who is respected and looked up to by the masses as a leader of the people, and a vessel through which the people speak and are heard by the government.

Is the part in bold above OK? I guess it needs either "of" or "about" after think .
Original Post
I would prefer if the sentence were punctuated differently, Mido. Here's how I'd write the first part:

When I think "President," I think "figurehead";..

This use of think without any accompanying preposition means something like "imagine" or "get a picture in my mind of" or "see in my mind's eye." Notice that this idiomatic use is for both President and figurehead.

What the writer means is that when he gets an image in his mind of what a president is, he sees an image of a figurehead and then he defines what figurehead means for him.

By the way, that's not how I would define figurehead. I would define a figurehead as a person who is put in an exaulted position but who has no real power. He or she is put there to look good and create some kind of iconic image of grandeur, but the person really has no authority to do anything of importance. That's left to the governing body, whatever it may be.
Thanks a lot, Richard.

So we can have a sentence like When I think "Physician," I think someone who cares for his/her patients and spares no effort to help them. Right?
Hmm ... Not quite, my friend. This idiomatic use of think normally has a parallel construction. In other words, When I think A, I think B, with A and B being the same kind of word. Notice that in the original sentence, there are two nouns describing a person, President and figurehead.

Your sentence would work if it were something like When I think "physician," I think "caregiver," someone who ....
(By the way, you shouldn't have capitalized physician.)

Here's another example with adjectives: When I think "red," I think "passionate."
quote:
This idiomatic use of think normally has a parallel construction. In other words, When I think A, I think B, with A and B being the same kind of word.

Dead clear!
Thank you so much, Richard. Smile

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