this group of

This group of chemicals .... believed to be harmful to people with asthma. 

1) is
2) are

Me: #1

Answer key: #2

My take: "This group of chemicals .... believed to be harmful to people with asthma."
I  take out "of chemicals", it is just a modifier.

"This group .... believed to be harmful to people with asthma."

Now it is clear the missing work must be [is].

Correct me if I am wrong.

(Two separate sources that contradict each other, though:

1. you know, this is a democratic party, who just recently now was raising their arms up in air screaming about, " Holy cow, look at the Russian hacking. So, this sort -- this group of democrats that have been so concerned about hacking over the last four weeks, now just released a guy that did gave one of the largest leaks to Assange in WikiLeaks in history. (Source: SPOK: Fox)

2.BWhile the 72-win mark is one of the headlines from his reign over the NBA, it takes a backseat to the six rings in any Jordan discussions. This group of Warriors only has the one championship together from last season and surely sees adding to that total as a bigger priority than the wins record. . (Source: Bleacher Report))

Original Post
Freeguy posted:

This group of chemicals .... believed to be harmful to people with asthma. 

1) is
2) are

Me: #1

Answer key: #2

My take: "This group of chemicals .... believed to be harmful to people with asthma."
I  take out "of chemicals", it is just a modifier.

"This group .... believed to be harmful to people with asthma."

Now it is clear the missing work must be [is].

Correct me if I am wrong.

Hi, Freeguy,

You are not wrong. You are right. Sometimes, however, group nouns can take a plural verb.  ("The family are all here.") This happens more often in British English than in American English. Perhaps the exercise is taken from a British workbook.

Freeguy posted:
(Two separate sources that contradict each other, though:

1. you know, this is a democratic party, who just recently now was raising their arms up in air screaming about, " Holy cow, look at the Russian hacking. So, this sort -- this group of democrats that have been so concerned about hacking over the last four weeks, now just released a guy that did gave one of the largest leaks to Assange in WikiLeaks in history. (Source: SPOK: Fox)

2.BWhile the 72-win mark is one of the headlines from his reign over the NBA, it takes a backseat to the six rings in any Jordan discussions. This group of Warriors only has the one championship together from last season and surely sees adding to that total as a bigger priority than the wins record. . (Source: Bleacher Report))

There is no contradiction. The subject of the plural verb in the first quotation is "that," whose antecedent is "democrats," which is plural. You are looking at a relative clause. The noun phrase as a whole ("this group of democrats that have been so concerned about hacking over the last four weeks") is singular and is the subject of "released." "Have" relates to "democrats." "Released" relates to "group."

The transcript of Ben Collins on Tucker Carlson Tonight has a few inaccuracies.  What he actually said was:

... this is the Democratic National — you know, this is the democrat party, who just recently now was raising their arms up in, in air screaming about, holy cow, look at the Russian hacking. So, this org... — this group the democrats that have been so concerned about hacking over the last four weeks now just released a guy that ja... — gave one of the largest leaks to, to Assange and WikiLeaks in, in history.

The fact that he said "this group the democrats" rather than "this group of democrats" does not contradict David's point, but rather reinforces it.

Earlier in the passage, he speaks of "the democrat party, who just recently now was raising their arms up".  As David says, singular collective nouns can sometimes take a plural verb, and "party", in this sense, is such a noun.  You can't have it both ways, though.  It should either be "the ... party, who just recently now was raising its arms up" (singular) or "the ... party, who just recently now were raising their arms up" (plural), and if this were a written speech or editorial, I would be inclined to be critical.  However, Mr Collins was speaking extemporaneously under severe time restrictions (as evidenced by his occasional stammering), and under the circumstances, I find such a lapse entirely excusable.

DocV

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