Ahmed Abdelhafeez posted:

Is it OK if I use present continuous or future simple in the main clause as following? 

"When I finish my exams, I.......to New York."

A- will  travel     b- am travelling   

Hi, Ahmed A.: Yes, both answers are grammatically correct. With the progressive ("When I finish my exams, I am traveling to New York"), the sentence expresses that this is your plan and present intention. With the future simple ("When I finish my exams, I will travel to New York"), the sentence merely expresses a fact.

Hi, Ahmed,

Please, forgive me, but I don't understand what you want to know exactly. In a previous thread, you asked a similar question:

https://thegrammarexchange.inf...0#590585063901927320

I replied: In formal exams the expected answer is to use 'will'.

You asked: Why not 'is travelling'?

I replied: If you want to ask about the possibility of using the present progressive in the main clause, then the answer is 'yes'. 

- When he reaches London, he will be staying / is going to stay / is staying with his friends.

Now, you ask the same question and David replied that both are correct. Strangely, you ask: Does it mean that we should use future simple not present continuous in the main clause?!!

ahmed_btm posted:
In a previous thread, you asked a similar question: [. . .]

I replied: In formal exams the expected answer is to use 'will'.

You asked: Why not 'is travelling'?

Hello, Ahmed and Ahmed,

There is no question of one not being formally correct or not as formally correct as the other. In each question, the present progressive is no less acceptable than the future simple. Both are perfectly correct and each answer ought to be deemed correct in your formal examinations.

If your Ministry of Education thinks otherwise, it should have a native speaker edit the test. Please have a representative of the Egyptian Ministry of Education make a post in this thread. I shall teach him or her about how the English language is used in these contexts. All these sentences are 100% correct:

  • When he finishes his exams, he is traveling to London.
  • He is traveling to London when he finishes his exams.

 

  • When I finish my exams, I am traveling to New York.
  • I am traveling to New York when I finish my exams.

 

  • When he finishes his exams, he will travel to London.
  • He will travel to London when he finishes his exams.

 

  • When I finish my exams, I will travel to New York.
  • I will travel to New York when I finish my exams.

The difference between them is that the present progressive represents the future action as a present plan or intention, whereas the future simple represents the future action as merely predicted. The more natural choice is the present progressive. It is preposterous that MiniEd should consider it incorrect.

Here is a context in which the future simple would be much better:

  • When he finishes his exams, he will receive a certificate.
  • He will receive a certificate when he finishes his exams.

In that example, the present plan or intention of "him" is irrelevant. The sentence is simply stating that the one thing will occur after the other. This type of case is much different from the two cases you have asked about, Ahmed A.  In your examples, the present progressive is quite natural and is perfectly correct.

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