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"Yes. In an ideal world, obviously, I would have loved to be a part of that squad but as things stand, I am happy to be going there and speaking about the matches. I am extremely excited to be doing this as well."

In the above sentence "TO BE" used in different contexts. Can you give me an insight about the different uses of "TO BE" in the above sentences?

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@Sundaran posted:

"Yes. In an ideal world, obviously, I would have loved to be a part of that squad but as things stand, I am happy to be going there and speaking about the matches. I am extremely excited to be doing this as well."

In the above sentence "TO BE" used in different contexts. Can you give me an insight about the different uses of "TO BE" in the above sentences?

Hi, Sundaran—In "would have loved to be a part of that squad," the infinitival clause ("to be a part of that squad") functions as the complement of the verb "loved."

In "happy to be going there and speaking about the matches" and "excited to be doing this," the infinitival clauses ("to be going there and speaking about the matches" and "to be doing this") function as the complement of adjectives.

@Sundaran posted:

In what situations we use "to be + ing?

The situations in which we use "to be + ing" are INFINITE, but they divide grammatically into situations in which "be" is a copula/linking verb (for example, "The movie is going to be interesting") and situations in which "be" is a progressive auxiliary verb (for example, "The movie is going to be playing").

Last edited by David, Moderator
@Sundaran posted:

Hi David, could you elaborate these usages in detail? Thanks in advance. 🙏

Well, Sundaran, do you understand the difference in use between linking-verb "be" (e.g., "John is tall") and progressive-auxiliary "be" (e.g., "John is running")?

If so, the same difference applies in infinitival clauses: "John hopes to be tall"; "John hopes to be running."

Last edited by David, Moderator
@Sundaran posted:

1) He is going to be performing today.

2) He is going to be performed today.

Sir, What is the difference between theses two sentences?

The first sentence is OK, and the second is not. "Be performing" is progressive and in the active voice; "be performed" is not progressive and in the passive voice. It doesn't make sence to say he will be performed, for that implies that someone will be performing him, and that makes no sense. But you can say:

3) passive voice: The piece is going to be performed by him today.
4) active voice: He is going to perform the piece today.

Last edited by David, Moderator

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