To Drink vs To drinking

Hello, Mokas, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange!

Only "open to drinking from it" is correct. In that adjective phrase, the adjective "open" is complemented by a prepositional phrase ("to" is a preposition there, not the stem of an infinitive) whose nominal object ("drinking from it") is a gerund phrase. The adjective "open" may be complemented by prepositional phrases, not by infinitive phrases.

That said, your sentence doesn't make sense, at least without more context. One can't really tell what "drinking from it" means. What does "it" refer to? I assume you mean to be speaking metaphorically, about "drinking inspiration." If that is the case, then I recommend a change of phrasing: "Your work will make you a continuous source of inspiration to all those who are receptive to you."

 I assume you mean to be speaking metaphorically, about "drinking inspiration.

I think the verb "drinking" could be kept if we replaced "source" with "fountain":

(From Longman dictionary) fountain of something: (written) a source or supply of something e.g. He was a fountain of information on Asian affairs.

- Your work will make you a continuous fountain of inspiration to all those who are open to drinking from it.

Perhaps, just as it happens in my native language (Spanish), in Mokas's language there is a single word that can mean both "source" and "fountain."

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×