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Neither sentence is correct. Sentence (1) should be "I am uncomfortable [with] answering the question" ("with" is optional), and (2) is ungrammatical.

Thank you.  I thought (1) is grammatically right but I was not sure about (2).

I didn't expect that (1) is not correct.  Can you tell me why it is not correct?

I found several websites showing the following.

(source) (source)

The reason is so we can know or tackle the specific areas, that we need to work on, but perhaps is making us uncomfortable to do so because it may shatter a self delusion or two!

For this reason, it’s important to expose yourself to many different situations in the workplace. It can be uncomfortable to do something unfamiliar, and the first time you try, you’re likely to make plenty of mistakes.

@GBLSU posted:

I didn't expect that (1) is not correct.  Can you tell me why it is not correct?

Neither "comfortable" nor "uncomfortable" are complemented by infinitives in well-structured, correct, natural, standard English. That's why (1) is wrong.

@GBLSU posted:

I found several websites showing the following.

(source) (source)

The reason is so we can know or tackle the specific areas, that we need to work on, but perhaps is making us uncomfortable to do so because it may shatter a self delusion or two!



You can find a lot of poorly written things on the Internet. This is a case in point. First, "to do so" should be "(with) doing so." Second, "is making us" should be "are making us" because the antecedent of the relative clause is plural. Third, there should be no comma before "that" (a comma is never used before a restrictive relative clause introduced by "that"). Fourth, "it may shatter" should be "they may shatter," the antecedent being plural. In short, the sentence is poorly written.

@GBLSU posted:


For this reason, it’s important to expose yourself to many different situations in the workplace. It can be uncomfortable to do something unfamiliar, and the first time you try, you’re likely to make plenty of mistakes.

In that sentence, "to do something unfamiliar" is not complementing "uncomfortable." Rather, the infinitival clause is an extraposed clause, related to the dummy "it," with which the setnence begins. "It can be uncomfortable to do something unfamiliar" means "To do something unfamiliar can be uncomfortable."

Last edited by David, Moderator

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