ahmad posted:

Do the following mean the same?

1. It is to submit that the report is baseless.
2. It is submitted that the report is baseless.

Hello, Ahmad,

No, they don't have the same meaning. Sentence (2) uses extraposition; it means "That the report is baseless is submitted."

Sentence (1) does not use extraposition. It could be used to answer the question "What is it for?", where "it" refers to something established in the context.

I assume (2) is closer to what you're trying to say. If (2) is itself making the "submission," I recommend adding "hereby." If it isn't, I'd use the present perfect.

(3) It is hereby submitted that the report is baseless.
(4) It has been submitted that the report is baseless.

You might also consider whether you really need the passive voice. Is the active voice ("We/I submit that the report is baseless") forbidden in the context?

ahmad posted:

I am sorry for replying so late. Without grasping the difference involved herein, I couldn't have replied.

Thanks.

Hi, Ahmad,

I don't follow you. What would you like me to understand by "Without grasping the difference involved herein, I couldn't have replied"?

Are you trying to say that you didn't understand my explanation and thanking me for nothing? Or are you trying to say that I helped you to grasp the difference?

 

I don't follow you. What would you like me to understand by "Without grasping the difference involved herein, I couldn't have replied"?

Are you trying to say that you didn't understand my explanation and thanking me for nothing? Or are you trying to say that I helped you to grasp the difference?

Hi, David,

Sir, you helped me to grasp the difference. Thanks.

PS: However, the intervening period has given rise to a further question which I will be posing soon.

David, Moderator posted:
 Sentence (1) does not use extraposition. It could be used to answer the question "What is it for?", where "it" refers to something established in the context.
 

Hi, David,

Is there a chance to read 'it' in '1' as introductory it?

If that is not so, then kindly explain with an example what you mean by "It could be used to answer the question "What is it for?", where "it" refers to something established in the context." 

Thanks.

ahmad posted:

Is there a chance to read 'it' in '1' as introductory it?

No, Ahmad. "it" cannot introduce a subject in extraposition in that sentence because it would be ungrammatical and nonsensical to say:

* That the report is baseless is to submit.

Instead, the passive voice is grammatical and meaningful, as David told you:

- That the report is baseless is (hereby) submitted.

If that is not so, then kindly explain with an example what you mean by "It could be used to answer the question "What is it for?", where "it" refers to something established in the context." 

I imagine that (1) could be a possible answer to this question:

A- What is the purpose of your letter to the manager?
B- It (The purpose of my letter) is to submit that the report (written by my supervisor) is baseless.

Hi, Gustavo,

I get you in to to, but I need to go a bit ahead still.

6. This is to submit for your information that the report is baseless.

7. It is to submit for your information that the report is baseless.

Are these sentences grammatical? Is the 'it' in '7' introductory it or something else?

Thanks.

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