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Hello Gustavo,



Thanks for the above. Can I clarify whether the 100K above is considered as an object? if yes, I don't see why the verb "total" cannot be passivised.

Alternatively, if the "100K" is not considered as an object, that means, the verb "total" can only be used in active voice or intransitive.

Other example includes,
The commission that I received for this month totalled/totalled to $100K [if it is not an object, this sentence is intransitive]

Am I not making any sense?

@Tony C posted:

Hello Gustavo,

Tony, it is David who replied to you. Even if we make a team, you should acknowledge the authorship of the reply. Thank you.

@Tony C posted:

Can I clarify whether the 100K above is considered as an object? if yes, I don't see why the verb "total" cannot be passivised.

Alternatively, if the "100K" is not considered as an object, that means, the verb "total" can only be used in active voice or intransitive.

Other example includes,
The commission that I received for this month totalled/totalled to $100K [if it is not an object, this sentence is intransitive]

Am I not making any sense?

Your new questions above are not very clear to me. One thing is clear — the verb "total" is a linking verb. That is why it cannot be used in the passive. When I saw your original sentence:

@Tony C posted:

The cleaning fee totalled to/totalled of $100K was paid by my company 2 weeks ago.

I thought you wanted to use "totalled" as a main verb in the past, which was of course also ungrammatical, as David told you.

Being a linking verb, you could use it in -ing form, but it would be very awkward:

- The cleaning fee totaling (to) $100K was paid by my company two weeks ago.

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor

Dear Gustavo, David,

I sincerely apologies for getting mixed up Gustavo and David, I had no intention not to be irrespective. You both have helped me a lot and I am not sure how to pay back, I am just hoping god will give you an abundance of love and blessings. I will try to be more careful next time.

Regarding my queries above, you have advised me previously that "totalled to/totalling to" is generally used intransitive verbs. In grammar, an intransitive verb does not allow a direct object. So,

Example 1: The commission that I received for this month totalling to $100K.

Observation of my example 1:

1. the verb totalling to here is an intransitive verb.

2. In grammar, an intransitive verb does not allow a direct object, but isn't that the $100K is an object, if so, this is in-contradictory to the grammar rules.

Also, I have another question, in my previous example the cleaning fee totaling (to) $100K was paid by my company two weeks ago. Is this an active voice or passive voice? Just wanted to confirm. If it is a passive voice, this means the totalled to is used as transitive verb, which is unusual.

Million thanks!

Sorry, Tony. Where I said in my previous post that "total (to)" was an intransitive verb, I should have said it was a linking verb (I have modified my reply). The verb "total," as used in your sentence, could be paraphrased as "amount to a total of" or "be equivalent to a total of." What follows it is not a direct object and passivization is not possible.

Final note: I don't understand your insistence on using a verb in a way that is not idiomatic. It's much better say a fee of ... than a fee totalling (to) ...

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor

Thanks Gustavo, just to clarify further:

1. when you say, the verb total is a linking verb, do you mean the verb "totalling" is followed by a preposition to? Which means it is the preposition and not the verb that followed by the object being the $100K. e.g. the deposits totalling to $1M. [intransitive verb still]

2. You stated that you don't understand my insistence on using a verb in a way that is not idiomatic. What you mean by "not idiomatic".

3. A fee of $100K, does it mean the same as A fee totalling to $100K, if so, next time, I will use what you suggested.

@Tony C posted:

1. when you say, the verb total is a linking verb, do you mean the verb "totalling" is followed by a preposition to? Which means it is the preposition and not the verb that followed by the object being the $100K. e.g. the deposits totalling to $1M. [intransitive verb still]

A linking verb joins a subject and a complement. The fee totals (to) $100K ⇒ The fee = $100K (the preposition "to" is neither necessary nor usual)

@Tony C posted:

2. You stated that you don't understand my insistence on using a verb in a way that is not idiomatic. What you mean by "not idiomatic".

"Not idiomatic" means that, though grammatical, it is not what native speakers would normally say or use.

@Tony C posted:

3. A fee of $100K, does it mean the same as A fee totalling to $100K, if so, next time, I will use what you suggested.

Yes, they mean the same thing, so please use what we suggested, a fee of $100K.

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor
@Tony C posted:

Thank you and Just a followed up questions

1. Does it mean advised followed by that acts as a "reporting verb"
2. What is the difference between "enter the office" and "enter into the office?"
3. Are all linking verb are "intransitive" meaning cannot be passivised, e.g, He appears to be very romatic

Tony C, it's really strange that you are asking the same follow-up questions as Cristi in this other thread:

In fact, I've discovered you are the same user. We don't like or accept this kind of deceit.

Unless you, or your alter ego Cristi, provide me with a good excuse, you will both be banned from this forum.

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Hello Gustavo,

Sorry for the misunderstanding but i can assure you not being deceived, we both live under the same roof and we learn and share together so that there is no replication. I am not actually sure what you’d like us to do, are we not allowed to have our own user account. If so, you can remove me and keep Cristi or vice versa and if I need to post something she can deal on my behalf if that helps.

You and David have helped us alot, and I sincerely appreciate. I am sure that you can see that we really want to learn and work so hard. Many thanks!

Dear Gustavo,

We totally understand your concerns and we can see why you were of the view that it is only 1 user.  So, basically we are husband and wife and we share 1 document in Onedrive for all questions that we have, including our son aged under 10 years old. We update both on our phone and in the computer that we share.

We initially thought of just having one account but it's completely unfair as it looks like all questions are coming from either Tony C or Cristi and for this reason each of us have a separate account. And at the end of the day, we posted the question to this forum on the PC that we share and split whose questions they belonged to. My son questions are allocated to Cristi.

All your responses (from you, David and Ahemed) to our questions are then documented so that we learn together and it really works. To avoid any confusion and misunderstanding, please kindly advise what we should do and once again our sincere apologies.

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