The person who controls a train is called the engineer. If everybody knows we're talking about trains, there's no need to say train engineer; it's understood.

By the way, if there's an employee on a passenger train who goes from car to car to check passengers' tickets and perhaps clip them, that person is called the conductor.
Engineer in this sense is American English. I assume driver is the correct word in British English.

May I add a bit of cultural knowledge here?

When I married my Egyptian husband years ago, he told me that his grandfather had been a railroad engineer. I just assumed he meant the driver of a train and thought nothing of it. Americans have always had a love of trains -- especially the old steam engines -- and it seemed a rather "romantic" occupation to me. (And since my own family is blue-collar, I thought nothing more of it.)

It was only fairly recently that I thought about this and started asking questions. Egyptian society is very class-conscious, and there seemed to be no way that a middle-class family like my husband's would have a member who drove a train -- a very low-class job here.

I finally came to understand that when he said "engineer" he meant exactly that: someone who was educated in engineering and designed things for rail transportation.

So, Izzy, be careful there with "engineer." Your audience might understand something totally different.
Thanks for the information about the difference here between AmE and BrE, my friend. It's important for the GE members to remember that both Rachel and I are American, and I, for one, don't claim to be an expert on BrE. Unless stated otherwise, members should understand that my answers are based on AmE. Wink

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