Hi, 

You looked exhausted. I think you’ve ______ more than you can handle.

          A. turned on     B. taken up     C. turned up   D. taken on

When I look them up in Oxford Dictionary, I rule out A and C but I am confused between B and D. 

Take up st means beginning or starting st such as a job

Take on sb/st means deciding to do st or being agree to be responsible for sb/st

Which one is the best appropriate in this situation? and What is the difference between take on and take up?

Thank you.

Original Post
novice posted:

You looked exhausted. I think you’ve ______ more than you can handle.

          A. turned on     B. taken up     C. turned up   D. taken on

When I look them up in Oxford Dictionary, I rule out A and C but I am confused between B and D.

Hi, Novice: The answer is (D): "I think you've taken on more than you can handle." The preposition "on" is commonly used in reference to responsibilities, which can become a burden, or can weigh down on someone, as if he or she were literally carrying them. In the example, the responsibility sense is operative. "Taken up" would be totally out of place. We use "take up" in sentences like "She has taken up dancing"; "He has taken up chess"; "They have taken up gardening." ♣

davidmoderator posted:
novice posted:

You looked exhausted. I think you’ve ______ more than you can handle.

          A. turned on     B. taken up     C. turned up   D. taken on

When I look them up in Oxford Dictionary, I rule out A and C but I am confused between B and D.

Hi, Novice: The answer is (D): "I think you've taken on more than you can handle." The preposition "on" is commonly used in reference to responsibilities, which can become a burden, or can weigh down on someone, as if he or she were literally carrying them. In the example, the responsibility sense is operative. "Taken up" would be totally out of place. We use "take up" in sentences like "She has taken up dancing"; "He has taken up chess"; "They have taken up gardening." ♣

Would you be kind to tell me why you used "would" instead of "will" here? 

gustavocontributor posted:

Would you be kind to tell me why you used "would" instead of "will" here? 

That is because there is an implicit condition: If  (= In the hypothetical event that) "taken up" were used, it would be totally out of place.

 

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