Hello, I am having trouble finding the rule for the usage of plural or singular in the following sentences: 1. There were two yellow and one red card/s awarded. 2. Two yellow and one red card were/ was awarded.    I feel like in sentence 1 - "There were two yellow and one red card awarded" is correct, and in sentence 2 - "Two yellow and one red card were awarded" is correct.  Grammarly accepts both plural and singular in both sentences. Please, please, can anyone name the rule for these examples so I can look it up and study it. (My enter key is not working, sorry for not writing this more nicely.) I appreciate all the help I can get from you. 

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Nico posted:

1. There were two yellow and one red card/s awarded. 2. Two yellow and one red card were/ was awarded.    I feel like in sentence 1 - "There were two yellow and one red card awarded" is correct, and in sentence 2 - "Two yellow and one red card were awarded" is correct.  Grammarly accepts both plural and singular in both sentences. Please, please, can anyone name the rule for these examples so I can look it up and study it.

Hello, Nico, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange!

"Were" is the verb that is needed, and you should say "one red card."

It is ungrammatical to say *one red cards.

"Two yellow and one red card" means "Two yellow [cards] and one yellow card."

That is a plural noun phrase. We use plural verbs with plural subjects in English.

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