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Which are correct:

1) In our restaurant, unlike in theirs, guests are treated with respect.

2) In our restaurant, unlike theirs, guests are treated with respect.

3) In your case, unlike in your cousin's, there are no mitigating circumstances.

4) In your case, unlike your cousin's, there are no mitigating circumstances.


Gratefully,
Navi

Original Post

Hi, Navi,

With so many postings on GE lately, this one remained forgotten on a previous page but I thought it was worth rescuing.

@navi posted:

Which are correct:

1) In our restaurant, unlike in theirs, guests are treated with respect.

2) In our restaurant, unlike theirs, guests are treated with respect.

3) In your case, unlike in your cousin's, there are no mitigating circumstances.

4) In your case, unlike your cousin's, there are no mitigating circumstances.

All of these sound fine to me, but according to Fowler both like and unlike are prepositions and can only be followed by nouns (as in 2 and 4). However, in these cases there arises a lack of parallelism (in our restaurant / their restaurant // in your case / your cousin's case).

According to prescriptivist grammar rules, your sentences could read as follows:

5) Our restaurant, unlike theirs, treats guests with respect.

6) Your case, unlike your cousin's, has/shows no mitigating circumstances.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

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