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@Cristi posted:

I believe if you use a conjunction e.g.  "but", there is no need to put a comma before but. Can you let me know in what circumstances, we can put a comma (,) before but. Thanking you in advance.

Hello, Cristi—In general, you need to use a comma before "but" when "but" introduces a second independent clause, but you don't always need to use a comma before "but" when it conjoins other types of phrase:

  • None but the brave deserve the fair.
  • It was warm but very windy.
Last edited by David, Moderator
@Cristi posted:

1. Can you give me an example when we need to usea "comma" for but?

Hi, Cristi—You mean to ask, "Can you give me an example of when to use a comma before 'but'? Without "of," your question asks me to give you an example at a certain time, namely, when we need to a comma for some word. And you don't mean "for"; you mean "before." The comma doesn't substitute for "but."

I have actually already given you an example of when to use a comma before "but," in the very sentence I used to give you the general rule. Do you know what an independent clause is? It is a clause that can stand alone as a sentence. If you have two such clauses, and they are conjoined by "but," you use a comma:

one independent clause: "In general, you need to use a comma before 'but' when 'but' introduces a second independent clause."

another independent clause: "You don't always need to use a comma before 'but' when it conjoins other types of phrase."

conjoined: "In general, you need to use a comma before 'but' when 'but' introduces a second independent clause, but you don't always need to use a comma before 'but' when it conjoins other types of phrase."

Do you see the comma before "but"? Here is a simpler example:

one independent clause: "I would go swimming right now."

another independent clause: "It is too cold outside (to go swimming)."

conjoined: "I would go swimming right now, but it is too cold outside."

@Cristi posted:

2. What do you mean by when it conjoins with types of phrase?

I didn't say "conjoins with types of phrase." I said "conjoins other types of phrase." When "but" conjoins/coordinates phrases that are smaller, syntactically, than independent clauses (phrases which are parts of independent clauses), there often does not need to be a comma before "but." For example:

(a) It is warm but windy outside.
(b) She likes vanilla but not chocolate.
(c) The treasure chest is in the house but underneath the floor.

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