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Hi, Rena,

Based on David's explanation, I can help you by telling you that this structure will almost always - if not always - appear in pairs formed by an affirmative and a negative sentence, just as David used it.

For example:

- It's not that I don't want to go because I have something else to do. It's that I've caught a cold and am not feeling well, that's all.

- It's not that I like her. It's just that I feel I must be good to her.

- I'm not saying that she is his favorite. It's just that he has a way with her that's different.
Hi, Rena,

quote:
Can you give me the answer of each of
your sentences


If you need an answer, there must be a question, and I can see no questions in my latest post above.

Do you want us to explain to you what those sentences mean? I think the sentences are quite simple as they are and explaining them would involve using more words and making the whole thing more complicated. Or do you want us to explain the effect of the cleft-sentence mechanism?

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