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Are the following sentences acceptable?

I have read that if the verb in the if-clause takes place after that in the main clause, then "will" or "be going to" can be used in the if-clause (the future verb in the if-clause is considered to be happening).

A. To be honest, if our product will/is going to fall under the anti-dumping regulations, then the prices we give to you won’t be competitive enough.

B. If these products will/are going to be examined by the customs, I will change the label before they are exported.

C. If the enemy will/is going to attack us by imposing sanctions, buying new weapons will be meaningless.

D. The quality is fine for now. But if the components will/ are going to be tested again by the end-user, the current quality of it won’t be satisfactory enough.

Last edited by JayLu
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Hello, JayLu, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

When "will" or "be going to" is acceptably used in the "if"-clause of a conditional, the conditional is not a Type 1 ("future real") conditional; it does not express a prediction contingent on the realization of a possible future occurence.

Rather, such a conditional assumes the future situation expressed by the "if"-clause as taken for granted in the context of discouse. Let me illustrate this with a mock conversation related to (B):

Speaker A: These products are going to be examined by customs.
Speaker B: Really? If so (i.e., if they are going to be examined by customs), I will change the label before they are exported.

David thank you for replying. I think there are many people saying that "will" should never be used in an if-clause but I think there are some exceptions.

For example:
A: We should buy more weapons in the future to protect our country.

B: The enemy has announced they will impose sanctions on us. If they will damage us economically, buying new weapons will be meaningless.

Is the conversation above the situation you are talking about?

Hello, JayLu, and welcome to G.E.

@JayLu posted:

"I will take the pill if it will make me feel better."

Does this mean that "making me feel better" is the future event that is believed to happen after the taking of the pill, which is as you mentioned, implied by the context?

Yes, your interpretation is correct. "If it will make me feel better" is similar to saying "if it is true that it will make me feel better."

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

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