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Hi, Atef,

@Atef Salama posted:

Thank you very much for your reply.

I know well that we can leave out the object pronouns but some colleagues say that when the relative pronoun refers to a person and a thing we cannot drop it, that is why I put my question here to put an end to our endless argument.

So, if you can prove that , I would appreciate it.

Thanks in advance.

I have never heard about such a rule, but Quirk in 'A comprehensive Grammar of the English language', page 1246, says:

"With coordinated antecedents of mixed gender, the choice of relative
pronoun may create a problem. It does not arise when zero relative is possible or when that is chosen, eg: The people and things she likes most."

Last edited by ahmed_btm
@Atef Salama posted:

I know well that we can leave out the object pronouns but some colleagues say that when the relative pronoun refers to a person and a thing we cannot drop it, that is why I put my question here to put an end to our endless argument.

Hi, Atef—When a relative pronoun functions as the direct object or the object of a preposition in a restrictive relative clause (one that is not set off by a comma), the relative pronoun does not need to be voiced or written, regardless of whether it refers to a person or a thing.

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