She asked, "What is your name?"
Do we have to change the tense when reporting this question? I think that both ways are possible since my name hasn't changed. So we can report the sentence this way: 

She asked what my name is / was. 
Any answer will be appreciated. Thanks in advance!

Original Post

Hello, Mo.Anwar, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

There are cases where the present is acceptable in reported speech, but I don't think this is one. Since it is obvious that a person's name does not change over time, there is no need to keep the present in this case. Quite the contrary, the past is required to bring the reader's or the listener's mind back to the moment when the question was asked:

- She asked what my name was.

Thank you so much for replying, my professor!
But what about this: She said, "Does the Earth orbit the sun?"
Should I report it like: She asked whether the Earth orbits the sun. 
Or 
Should I report it like: She asked whether the Earth orbited the sun. 

Gustavo, Contributor posted:

Although both are possible, backshifting (i.e. replacing the present with the past) continues to be more elegant than keeping the present, as it takes us back to that moment when the question was asked.

You mean that if we want to emphasize the time when the words were uttered, we use backshifting. But, if we want to emphasize the fact that the situation is still true, we don't backshift the tense. So in the "name" example, we can use both ways.

Mo.Anwar posted:
Gustavo, Contributor posted:

Although both are possible, backshifting (i.e. replacing the present with the past) continues to be more elegant than keeping the present, as it takes us back to that moment when the question was asked.

You mean that if we want to emphasize the time when the words were uttered, we use backshifting. But, if we want to emphasize the fact that the situation is still true, we don't backshift the tense. So in the "name" example, we can use both ways.

No, I don't think the present would be fine in the "name" example. It's not a question of grammar, but of pragmatics. I think the present is only acceptable (though not the better option) with scientific truths, schedules or routine actions, and events that are still pending to take place.

https://thegrammarexchange.inf...rdhFsEptpV2hvhG0UH1k

What about these sentences?
1- Are you good at organising people?
2- Do you enjoy working in a team?
3- What do you do when your ideas don't work?
4- Do you listen to other people's advice/suggestions?
5- What do you do when you have too much work?
6- What time do you normally start work?

- He asked me whether I was/am good at organizing people.

2- He asked me whether I enjoyed/enjoy working in a team.

3- He asked me what I did/do when my ideas didn't/don't work.

4- He asked me whether I listened/listen to other people's advice/suggestions.

5- He wanted to know what I did/do when I had/have too much work.

6- He wanted to know what time I normally started/start work.

Why the present here is possible as mentioned by Amy?

All of those sentences refer to routine actions. This is not the case with one's name, and the same would apply to one's nationality: permanent features that will not normally change. When reporting such questions, the interest lies in reporting what the person asked, not in asserting that one's name or nationality continues to be the same. See this question I found in the grammar section of the Cambridge dictionary when asking somebody's identity:

‘Who are you?’ she asked.

She asked me who I was.

It would just not sound right to say:

- ?She asked me who I am. (There is no doubt that I continue to be the same person I was when she asked me -- what needs to be done is to report the question correctly, not to indicate that my identity has not changed by using the present tense!)

See what Michael Swan says on page 249 of his Practical English Usage:

Notice he says it is often (not always) also possible to keep the present tense in the reported sentence, and that is mainly when the statement or question being reported is recent or, as I tried to explain to the best of my knowledge, when there is a valid reason to avoid backshifting, which is not the case here.

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