Skip to main content

Replies sorted oldest to newest

Hi Sarah,

The word as (with do the) above explain how caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women relates to "restrict what is possible". That is because caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women, also "restrict what is possible" in addition to age and poor health.

Hope this helps!

Last edited by AnstonRoy
@AnstonRoy posted:

Hi Sarah,

The word as above reasons out why it is required to "restrict what is possible". That is because caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women, according to the sentence.  But as they use "As" instead of "Because" I hope it implies this is not the direct cause necessarily, but two incidents happen at the same time.

Moreover, "As" here is a conjunction and  it introduces a subordinate clause. One thing I'm not sure about is, is "do the" part necessary. I hope someone will answer.

Hope this helps!

Thank you. You explaination is quite clear and easy to understand.

@Sarah Zhou posted:

A third is that age and poor health, even when these do not amount to disability, restrict what is possible, as do the caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women.

what does "as" mean in this sentence?

Hi, Sarah Zhou—Please visit the Guidelines page for this forum. When you quote something here, you must show that you are quoting it by using quotation marks. You must also tell us what the source of the quotation is.

I assume that the source of your quotation is this article. I don't know what Anston is trying to say in his explanation, but I'm glad that you somehow found it clear. Let me tell you what is going on with "as" in that sentence.

"As" refers back to the predicate "restrict what is possible" and asserts that it applies to the subject of the "as"-clause ("the caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women").

  • Age and poor health restrict what is possible. The caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women restrict what is possible, too.
  • Age and poor health restrict what is possible. The caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women do, too.
  • Age and poor health restrict what is possible. So do the caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women.
  • Age and poor health restrict what is possible, as do the caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women.

Hi, Sarah Zhou—Please visit the Guidelines page for this forum. When you quote something here, you must show that you are quoting it by using quotation marks. You must also tell us what the source of the quotation is.

I assume that the source of your quotation is this article. I don't know what Anston is trying to say in his explanation, but I'm glad that you somehow found it clear. Let me tell you what is going on with "as" in that sentence.

"As" refers back to the predicate "restrict what is possible" and asserts that it applies to the subject of the "as"-clause ("the caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women").

  • Age and poor health restrict what is possible. The caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women restrict what is possible, too.
  • Age and poor health restrict what is possible. The caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women do, too.
  • Age and poor health restrict what is possible. So do the caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women.
  • Age and poor health restrict what is possible, as do the caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women.

Thanks for reminding me to use the quotation marks and showing me how a simple sentence evolve to a complicated one.
We usually call a inverted sentence right?

@AnstonRoy posted:

Hi Sarah, I changed my answer after David's great explanation.He simply dissolved the complex sentence and clearly showed us what this complex sentence is made of.

  • Age and poor health restrict what is possible. The caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women restrict what is possible, too.
  • Age and poor health restrict what is possible. The caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women do, too.
  • Age and poor health restrict what is possible. So do the caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women.
  • Age and poor health restrict what is possible, as do the caring responsibilities routinely and disproportionately shouldered by women.

AnstonRoy, David's explanation is indeed superb. Nobody could have done it better. It's a grammatical pleasure to see how each sentence leads to the following.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×