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Tiffany shareholders are expected this week to approve a merger with French luxury giant LVMH that would close months of drama that nearly killed the $15.8 billion agreement. -- from a headline on the front page of Today's WSJ.
I think the above clause in italic is a content clause. What does it modify? The whole part before it (Tiffany ... LVMH) or just the word "merger"? Please comment.
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Hi, Jason,

Tiffany shareholders are expected this week to approve a merger with French luxury giant LVMH that would close months of drama that nearly killed the $15.8 billion agreement. -- from a headline on the front page of Today's WSJ.
I think the above clause in italic is a content clause. What does it modify? The whole part before it (Tiffany ... LVMH) or just the word "merger"? Please comment.

I can't see the italics. If you refer to "that would close months of drama that nearly killed the $15.8 billion agreement," that is a relative clause.

I agree that the relative clause modifies "merger," but it may also be said to modify the noun phrase "merger with French luxury giant LVMH" as a whole. The noun phrase headed by "merger" has a prepositional phrase adjunct/modifier ("with French luxury giant LVMH") and a relative clause adjunct/modifier ("that would close months of drama that nearly killed the $15.8 billion agreement"). The second adjunct overlaps the first rather than operating wholly independently of it.

BTW, Jason, please remember to enclose quotations inside quotation marks.

Last edited by David, Moderator

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