Hello,

In the last paragraph of a scientific article below, there is a sentence “It also limits potentially qualified students from participating in the talent pool tapped to fill advance jobs where the work force in dwindling, such as those in science, technology and engineering."

I copied and pasted this paragraph.

 My question 1:Shouldn’t  “in” before “dwindling” be “is”? Is it a typo?

My question 2: What does “those” in the last sentence refer to?

My question 3: Is “those” necessary for the sentence to make sense?

apple

"Choking is a serious problem, given that poor exam performance affects students' subsequent academic opportunities," she said. "It also limits potentially qualified students from participating in the talent pool tapped to fill advance jobs where the work force in dwindling, such as those in science, technology and engineering."

 https://www.sciencedaily.com/r.../01/110113141605.htm

Original Post

Hi, Apple,

Answer 1: Yes, it is a typo.

Answer 2: "those" refers to "advance jobs."

Answer 3: More than necessary, I think "those" makes that exemplification clearer. Without "those," I'd use "as" instead of "such as" (do you agree, David and DocV?):

"It also limits potentially qualified students from participating in the talent pool tapped to fill advance jobs where the work force is dwindling, as (is the case/happens) in science, technology and engineering."

While the phrase starting with "such as" refers back to the noun phrase "advance jobs" --hence the convenience to use "those"--, the "as"-phrase is more like a sentence modifier. Notice that we could replace it with "which": "... which is the case/which happens in science, technology and engineering."

Gustavo, Contributor posted:
Answer 2: "those" refers to "advance jobs."


Answer 3: More than necessary, I think "those" makes that exemplification clearer. Without "those," I'd use "as" instead of "such as" (do you agree, David and DocV?):

"It also limits potentially qualified students from participating in the talent pool tapped to fill advance jobs where the work force is dwindling, as (is the case/happens) in science, technology and engineering."

While the phrase starting with "such as" refers back to the noun phrase "advance jobs" --hence the convenience to use "those"--, the "as"-phrase is more like a sentence modifier. Notice that we could replace it with "which": "... which is the case/which happens in science, technology and engineering."

Hi, Apple and Gustavo,

While I fully support your answer as a definite possibility, Gustavo, part of me wonders whether the intended referent of "those" might in fact be "students."

I think we should bear in mind that this is a spoken sentence. It could be that a "such as" phrase relating to "students" has been delayed -- viz.:

  • It also limits potentially qualified students, such as those [students] in science, technology, and engineering, from participating in the talent pool tapped to fill advance jobs where the work force in dwindling.

 

  • It also limits potentially qualified students from participating in the talent pool tapped to fill advance jobs where the work force is dwindling, such as those [students] in science technology, and engineering.

I am inclined toward that interpretation because the article as a whole is focused on students, not jobs. Incidentally, I question the accuracy of "advance jobs."

apple posted:
"advance jobs" mean(s?) highly techincal jobs that need expertise?

Hi, Apple,

Yes, I thought that that was the intended meaning. If it was, we must suppose that "advance" contains a typo, since such jobs would be "advanced jobs."

An "advance job" would be a job that is made available in advance, i.e., beforehand. That meaning seems unlikely to me. I think the "d" was left out.

Apple,

So, is it safe to assume that  "advanced jobs" is a natural sounding, commonly used  phrase?

I wouldn't go that far.  I agree with David that "highly technical jobs that need expertise" is the most likely intended meaning of "advance [sic] jobs".  The combination of repeated typographical errors on the part of the author and the appearance that Dr Bellock was speaking extemporaneously leave room for doubt both as to what was actually said and what was actually meant.  (I believe we can rule out the "lost in translation" factor.  Dr Bellock was born in Berkeley, California, and is a native speaker of English.)

I don't find "advanced jobs" to be either natural sounding or commonly used.  It sounds like a phrase that came to Dr Bellock on the spot when she was experiencing very similar pressure to the type she was actually researching at the time.  I think I would prefer a phrase like "highly skilled positions" or "highly specialized positions" over "advanced jobs".

DocV

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