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Hi everyone, I'm new to Grammar Exchange and I hope someone can help me with these two sentences.

"Eat a lot of vegetables 'and' you will be healthy"

"Eat a lot of vegetables 'or' you will no be healthy".

I have not clear if they are subordinate clauses or not.

Thanks in advance for your help and have a great day.

 

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor
Original Post

Hello, Felipe, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

@Felipe posted:

"Eat a lot of vegetables 'and' you will be healthy"

"Eat a lot of vegetables 'or' you will not be healthy".

I have not clear if they are subordinate clauses or not.

Actually, these (not "theses," as you wrote in your title, which I corrected) are compound sentences formed by two coordinate clauses.

In his Advanced Language Practice, Michael Vince presents them as colloquial variations of conditional sentences where an imperative is used instead of an if clause in everyday speech.

Therefore,

Eat a lot of vegetables and you will be healthy (= Eat a lot of vegetables. That way, you will be healthy)

is equivalent to:

If you eat a lot of vegetables, you will be healthy.

and

Eat a lot of vegetables or you will not be healthy (= Eat a lot of vegetables. Otherwise, you will not be healthy)

is equivalent to:

Unless you eat a lot of vegetales, you will not be healthy.

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor

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