Hi

Can you please explain the difference?

1. I hope the WiFi works when I'm writing my bachelor‘s thesis.

2. I hope the WiFi is working when I'm writing my bachelor‘s thesis.

3. I hope the WiFi works when write my bachelor‘s thesis.

(From EO)

Original Post
Tara posted:

Can you please explain the difference?

1. I hope the WiFi works when I'm writing my bachelor‘s thesis.
2. I hope the WiFi is working when I'm writing my bachelor‘s thesis.
3. I hope the WiFi works when write my bachelor‘s thesis.

Hi, Tara,

Sentence (3) is ungrammatical, but I believe you made a typo. I think you meant to type "I" between "when" and "write":

(3') I hope the WiFi works when I write my bachelor's thesis.

Now the sentence is grammatical, but it is the oddest sentence of the three. It could be interpreted as suggesting that writing your bachelor's thesis will cause the WiFi to work.

A: The WiFi isn't working.
B: Have you tried writing your bachelor's thesis?
A: No. Good idea. I hope it works when I do.

I'm being facetious, of course. The above conversation is silly. Sentences (1) and (2) are better than (3). I don't think it's necessary to double up on the progressive, though. Putting it in one of the clauses is enough. I like (1) better than (2), but both are fine. Here's another permutation that works. Perhaps you meant to include it:

(4) I hope the WiFi is working when I write my bachelor's thesis.

David, Moderator posted:
Tara posted:

Can you please explain the difference?

1. I hope the WiFi works when I'm writing my bachelor‘s thesis.
2. I hope the WiFi is working when I'm writing my bachelor‘s thesis.
3. I hope the WiFi works when write my bachelor‘s thesis.

Hi, Tara,

Sentence (3) is ungrammatical, but I believe you made a typo. I think you meant to type "I" between "when" and "write":

(3') I hope the WiFi works when I write my bachelor's thesis.

Now the sentence is grammatical, but it is the oddest sentence of the three. It could be interpreted as suggesting that writing your bachelor's thesis will cause the WiFi to work.

A: The WiFi isn't working.
B: Have you tried writing your bachelor's thesis?
A: No. Good idea. I hope it works when I do.

I'm being facetious, of course. The above conversation is silly. Sentences (1) and (2) are better than (3). I don't think it's necessary to double up on the progressive, though. Putting it in one of the clauses is enough. I like (1) better than (2), but both are fine. Here's another permutation that works. Perhaps you meant to include it:

(4) I hope the WiFi is working when I write my bachelor's thesis.

Thank you so much ! ! ! !

Can't (4) mean when I start to writ it or we I'm going to write it not the whole time that I'm writing since "when" refers to a specific time not a duration?

Tara posted:
Can't (4) mean when I start to writ it or we I'm going to write it not the whole time that I'm writing since "when" refers to a specific time not a duration?

Yes, Tara, it can mean that. But it doesn't have to mean that. There is no rule that "when" can't refer to something durative when the action in its clause is durative.

David, Moderator posted:
Tara posted:
Can't (4) mean when I start to writ it or we I'm going to write it not the whole time that I'm writing since "when" refers to a specific time not a duration?

Yes, Tara, it can mean that. But it doesn't have to mean that. There is no rule that "when" can't refer to something durative when the action in its clause is durative.

How should we know "when" refers to something durative or not?

Tara posted:

How should we know "when" refers to something durative or not?

Hi, Tara,

"When" is a subordinating conjunction. It is used to introduce subordinate clauses. Clauses have subject phrases and verb phrases. If the verb phrase is durative, then the "when"-clause itself refers to something durative.

Suppose I say, "I will read a novel when I fly from California to Virginia." The flight will take longer than an instant; it will actually take five hours. Thus, the verb phrase and the "when"-clause refer to something durative.

David, Moderator posted:
Tara posted:

How should we know "when" refers to something durative or not?

Hi, Tara,

"When" is a subordinating conjunction. It is used to introduce subordinate clauses. Clauses have subject phrases and verb phrases. If the verb phrase is durative, then the "when"-clause itself refers to something durative.

Suppose I say, "I will read a novel when I fly from California to Virginia." The flight will take longer than an instant; it will actually take five hours. Thus, the verb phrase and the "when"-clause refer to something durative.

Thank you sooo much ! ! ! ! !

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