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1) We have to have done it enough times where if something is wrong, we know it.

Source:
https://books.google.com/books...ve%20done%22&f=false

I came across that sentence by chance. I wonder if it is grammatical. "Where" has been used in it in a somewhat strange way, I'd say. I think I hear this kind of thing a lot. "Where" seems to be expanding its territory.

Gratefully.
Navi.
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quote:
1) We have to have done it enough times where if something is wrong, we know it.
Hello, Navi,

I find that sentence incorrect as written. It could, however, be made correct in informal English with a very simple addition: "to." If we insert the preposition "to" between "time" and "where" -- I would also add a couple of commas -- the phrase "to where" will be the informal equivalent of the more standard "to the point where." Various revisions suggest themselves:
    1a) We have to have done it enough times, to where, if something is wrong, we know it.

    1b) We have to have done it enough times, to the point where, if something is wrong, we know it.

    1c) We have to have practiced it to the point where, if something is wrong, we know it.

    1d) We have to have done it enough times to know right away that something is wrong when something is wrong.
Thank you, David, for "translating" that sentence for us. Honestly, I couldn't make heads or tails of it!

quote:
"Where" seems to be expanding its territory.


According to David's explanation, "where" seems to keep its predominantly locative meaning in that sentence, though "the point" is not a physical but an abstract stage.

Speaking of the "expansion" of "where," what has always called my attention is the fact that "where" is very close to "when" mainly in reduced adverbial clauses where the latter could be used. I refer to clauses like "where(ver) possible/applicable/required."

Do you agree with me?
Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

Hmmm - I find most replies quite strange: "We have to have done it enough times where if something is wrong, we know it."

It seems to me to be a convoluted way of saying "We must have done it enough times for us to know if something is wrong"

Anyway, sticking with the original sentence, the use of "where" is always incorrect if not used to specify a location. Substitute "that" for it: "We have to have done it enough times that, if something is wrong, we [would] know it."

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