The rise of a new major financial center in Asia (or anywhere else, for that matter) will depend on several factors, the most important of which will be whether officials in New York and London finally decide to make the kind of regulatory changes that now seem imminent and necessary.

Does 'which' indicate 'several factors'?
And is 'factor' omitted after 'the most important'?

Thanks a lot.
Original Post
quote:
The rise of a new major financial center in Asia (or anywhere else, for that matter) will depend on several factors, the most important of which will be whether officials in New York and London finally decide to make the kind of regulatory changes that now seem imminent and necessary.

'The most important of which' refers to 'factors.' Then the factor is described.

Mehrdad, I don't get 'one.' Where should we put 'one'? If we say, '...the most important one will be...' we don't have an adjective clause anymore; we would have to start a new sentences with 'The most important one...'
quote:
'The most important of which' refers to 'factors.'

I would say only "which" refers to "factors."

"The most important of which" will then refer to "whether officials in New York and London finally decide to make the kind of regulatory changes that now seem imminent and necessary."


quote:
If we say, '...the most important one will be...' we don't have an adjective clause anymore

I didn't mean this, Rachel! I meant we could say "one" has been omitted before "of which."
"The most important one of which will be whether ..."
quote:
The rise of a new major financial center in Asia will depend on several factors, the most important of which will be...


It is grammatically wrong if I put the word one before of which as follows, right?

The rise of a new major financial center in Asia will depend on several factors, the most important one of which will be...

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