(1) His Military Service is done in the Army Forces on 1st March 2008.

(2) His Military Service was done in the Army Forces on 1st March 2008

and is it possible to say:

(3) His Military Service has been done in the Army Forces on 1st March 2008.

Thanks

Original Post
ceedhanna posted:

(1) His Military Service is done in the Army Forces on 1st March 2008.
(2) His Military Service was done in the Army Forces on 1st March 2008

and is it possible to say:

(3) His Military Service has been done in the Army Forces on 1st March 2008.

Hello, Ceedhanna,

Please remember to try to title your threads with words or phrases that describe the grammatical topic explored in the thread. Here a fitting title would have been "is/was/has been done."

Assuming the time of speech is now (in August of 2019), the only sentence of the three that works is (2). Logically enough, because we are talking about something in the past, we use the past tense.

If the time of speech were before March of 2008, then (1) would be correct and (2) would be incorrect. Sentence (1) would then mean that his military service will be done (i.e., finished) on March 1, 2008.

Sentence (3) is incorrect because we do not use the present perfect with specific past time adverbials. It is ungrammatical to do so. The prepositional phrase "on 1st March 2008" is a specific past-time adverbial.

Hello, Ceedhanna, 

If you let me say my opinion about the sentences above, I would say that:

Sentence NO. (1) is definitely correct. 

Concerning sentence NO. (2), I would think present simple can be used, especially in narrating stories, but the sentence looks weird when it stands alone. 

ceedhanna posted:

and is it possible to say:

(3) His Military Service has been done in the Army Forces on 1st March 2008.

Thanks

I guess no. Present Perfect is never used with a definite past time.

Hussein Hassan posted:

Should I remove my reply? 

No, Hussein, you may leave your reply, but please note that your judgement that "Sentence NO. (1) is definitely correct" is right only if we suppose that the time at which the sentence is uttered or written is not now but before March of 2008. That is an unusual context. On an grammar test, a student could not be expected to make such an assumption on his or her own. Thus, if this is a testing item, and there is no such contextual stipulation built into the question, (1) is incorrect.

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