Could you please help me with the grammar of this sentence? It's from an essay in a book on IELTS by Cambridge University Press.

People turn to buying the new brand from overseas nations, perhaps thinking it more glamorous than the one they are used to. As a result, local companies are likely to maximize their profits as they import foreign products.

Is it more glamorous grammatically correct, and if yes, why isn't it it IS more...?

Thank you!

Original Post

Hello, mmd, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

The sentence:

People turn to buying the new brand from overseas nations, perhaps thinking it more glamorous than the one they are used to.

is correct. The structure in bold corresponds to a usual pattern in English formed by: Verb + Object + Object Complement. The object complement is a word (an adjective, a noun, a participle) that describes the object. Instead of "think," we can also use "find" or "consider":

- People find it (the imported brand) more glamorous than the one they are used to.

- People consider it (the imported brand) more glamorous than the one they are used to.

Alternatively, you can use the structure with the content clause:

- People think / find / consider (that) it (the imported brand) is more glamorous than the one they are used to.

Gentlemen, I think that one of the things that makes the parsing of this sentence confusing is the fact that the object of "thinking" is the neuter pronoun "it", whose subject and object cases are identical.  Here's a parallel construct that I hope makes things more clear:

1a: He is asking Monica to the dance, finding her more glamorous than Maxine.

Here it's clear that, as Gustavo said, we are following the pattern of verb ("finding") + object ("her") + object complement ("more glamorous").  We cannot say

1b: *He is asking Monica to the dance, finding her is more glamorous than Maxine.

because "her" is not a subject-case pronoun.

Also, we can't say

1c: *He is asking Monica to the dance, finding she more glamorous than Maxine.

But, as Gustavo also points out, we can express the same thought with the content-clause structure:

1d: He is asking Monica to the dance, finding (that) she is more glamorous than Maxine.

MMD, I hope you find this helpful.  Both your original example "finding it more glamorous" and your alternative "finding it is more glamorous" are acceptable, but my personal bias is toward the original.

DocV

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