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Example: The past work history of Alex may be a circumstance that affects the risk of termination but would not sensibly surmount the countless ways in which he could cease employment in the course of one year let alone an assessment of each of four years.

1. In the above sentence, can I change "would not" to "will not"? If I can, any difference in meaning?  what is more grammatically right and why?

2.  What is the function of let alone there?

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@Tony C posted:

Example: The past work history of Alex may be a circumstance that affects the risk of termination but would not sensibly surmount the countless ways in which he could cease employment in the course of one year let alone an assessment of each of four years.

Where have you taken this sentence from, Tony? It contains several inconsistencies but, remember, we are not a proofreading service. To be able to answer your questions, the sentence should be overall correct.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator
@Tony C posted:

Haha, are you serious? How can they be a lawyer if they are not good at writing, their English should be superior than anyone else. I also find it a bit hard to understand.

From my experience, I can assure you that it is a misconception that all lawyers are good writers. Their style of writing is so convoluted that they sometimes forget the rules of grammar and lose the thread of what they are saying.

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