Hi, Rasha,

I'd say "They haven't studied much / enough / hard / hard enough" rather than "They haven't studied well."

The difference between "will" and "going to" to express future is not so clearcut as books say.

According to textbooks, the sentences you have come up with express predictions based on evidence in which "going to" will typically be used. However, you could say:

- I think they will fail/lose the match.
Hi, Gustavo,

If we changed the sentences to the positive;

They have studied well, they ______ succeed.
They have trained well, they ______ win.

How could we use "going to"? Do you mean their training & studying are real evidences? I've read before that we couldn't say that a student is going to succeed without a real evidence like; seeing their answers, even if they have studied well.

The same case with the second sentence, how many points/goals have they scored? "a real evidence". We just predict before the match. Shouldn't we use "will"?

Another question:

You said that we can say:

I think they will fail/lose the match. According to what you've mentioned that their training is a real evidence, why couldn't we say:

"I think they are going to lose/fail the match."?

Thanks!
Hi, Hussein,

quote:
Do you mean their training & studying are real evidences?


Definitely. On the basis of the fact that they have studied hard or trained well, we can predict they they will (= are going to) succeed or win.

quote:
I think they will fail/lose the match. According to what you've mentioned that their training is a real evidence, why couldn't we say:

"I think they are going to lose/fail the match."?


As I said above, both "will" and "be going to" can be used for prediction, and they can both be preceded by "I think" and similar structures. There is no contradiction between the existence of evidence and saying "I think": actually, because I know they have studied hard or trained well, I can say I think they will/are going to succeed or win.

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