with all

1-With all his warring and ruling, ruling and warring, he seemed slightly aged since the last time those warriors had seen him.

Does this mean:
a-In spite of all his warring and ruling, ruling and warring, he seemed slightly aged since the last time those warriors had seen him.
or:
b-Because of all his warring and ruling, ruling and warring, he seemed slightly aged since the last time those warriors had seen him.

or it could mean either.
Original Post
Your point is interesting. Let's see what Rachel and Richard are saying, but I don't see enough reason for that.

Still, I found:

----
with:

13 a : allowing for : in spite of : NOTWITHSTANDING <a really tip-top man, with all his wrongheadedness -- H.J.Laski>

Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged.
----

which would support "in spite of."

Had this been, "only slightly aged," I'd go for "in spite of."
This is a difficult reading.

Look, even very experienced commentators flip-flop in, say, reading Shakespeare when a similar expression occurs. See this great site on his sonnets that I recommend everyone for its modern interpretations:

---
1. As an unperfect actor on the stage,
2. Who with his fear is put beside his part,

is read as both:

2. with his fear = out of [because of] fear; accompanied by fear.

http://www.shakespeares-sonnets.com/xxiiicomm.htm

"Out of [because of]" and "accompanied by" are quite different to me, but they can't tell which to choose, and I'm not surprised.

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×