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1) Ignatius Street was a particular problem area with the quality of lighting very poor at each end of it.

2) ‘Ignatius Street was a particular problem area with the quality of lighting being very poor at each end of it.

I found '1' in the Oxford dictionary.

https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/poor

Meaning '2' (click of 'more example sentences')

Sentence '2' is mine.

My question is whether in '1' and in '2' Ignatius Street was a particular problem area because the quality of lighting was very poor at each end of it; or the poor quality of lighting was a contributing factor to the street being a particular problem; or the quality of lighting was something to consider in addition to the street being a particular problem.

Gratefully,
Navi

Original Post

Hi, Navi,

@navi posted:

1) Ignatius Street was a particular problem area with the quality of lighting very poor at each end of it.

2) ‘Ignatius Street was a particular problem area with the quality of lighting being very poor at each end of it.

I found '1' in the Oxford dictionary.

https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/poor

Meaning '2' (click of 'more example sentences')

Sentence '2' is mine.

My question is whether in '1' and in '2' Ignatius Street was a particular problem area because the quality of lighting was very poor at each end of it; or the poor quality of lighting was a contributing factor to the street being a particular problem; or the quality of lighting was something to consider in addition to the street being a particular problem.

I think that the absence of a comma leads us to interpret the clause starting with "with" as one of reason: it is a problem area because of the poor lighting. With a comma, the same clause would be interpreted as descriptive of an additional problem the area has.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

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