Words order

Good morning, our teachers, hope that all of you are fine.

In "25 Biggest Mistakes Teachers Make and How to Avoid Them" book, I found the following sentence:

"Once you become a screamer, you will forever a screamer be.Screenshot_2018-07-07-14-38-52"

Is it syntactically correct, i.e. why is "be" at the end of the sentence?

Shouldn't it be:

"Once you become a screamer, you will be a screamer forever."

Or:

"Once you become a screamer, you will forever be a screamer."

I also wonder if "Once you become a screamer, you will, forever, be a screamer." is correct or not.

Thank you.

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husseinhassan posted:

"Once you become a screamer, you will forever a screamer be.

[...]

Is it syntactically correct, i.e. why is "be" at the end of the sentence?

Hi, Hussein: Interesting question. In normal speech, the order should be as you have stated in your alternatives. However, in poetic English, the complement of a verb sometimes precedes the verb. Even though you are not reading poetry here, the author has used poetic phrasing in the part of the sentence in question so as to impart a proverbial quality to it, i.e., to make it sound like a proverb. The sentence is too complex to accommodate the simple proverbial formula a native speaker would naturally expect here: "Once a screamer, always a screamer."

Independence Day in the U.S. is July 4th. This year I celebrated by posting the lyrics of the song "America the Beautiful," which is based on a poem by Katherine Lee Bates. The second stanza concerns immigration. The first sentence of that stanza is: "O beautiful for pilgrim feet, / Whose stern impassioned stress / A thoroughfare for freedom beat / Across the wilderness!" Notice that the direct object of "beat" comes before the verb. Normal order would have been: ". . . whose stern impassioned stress beat a thoroughfare for freedom across the wilderness."

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