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Regarding the COVID-19 Pandemic

David, Moderator
Dear Grammar Exchange members, As we continue our grammar discussions, I want you to know that I am aware that we are all struggling in various ways as a result of the current pandemic and that my heart goes out to all of you. I hope that you and your loved ones are safe and healthy. Although we may not know each other personally, we all know that there is much more to us than the English grammar issues we discuss here. This post is devoted to the dimensions of you and your lives that I know...Read More...
Thank you. On Fri, Aug 28, 2020 at 2:36 PM The Grammar Exchange < alerts@crowdstack.com > wrote:Read More...
Last Reply By Gopal Bhattarai · First Unread Post

Topics

Years of experience or year-experience?

Hi admin. If I want to say a worker who already has experience in a field for 5 years. Which noun phrase I could use here? - A worker with five years of experience. - A worker having five years' experience. - A 5-year-experience worker. Thank you very much.Read More...

Do you find them correct?

I think they must be correct. Do you agree? 1 Which one of these three schools ' headmaster are you? One modifies schools . 2 Which one of these three schools' headmasters is you? (A person is looking at a picture with headmasters and knows that I am one of them but wants to know which one of them is me)Read More...

Was from/resulted from/arose from

Hi, In the following sentence, which of the above word can be used? You state that the amount of $1M you received was from/resulted from/arose from your alleged redemption of units in the XYZ unit trust which was then used to pay off your deb.Read More...
Do we use active or passive in the below sentence? The funds were proceeded from the bribe. The funds proceeded from the bribe.Read More...
Last Reply By Cristi · First Unread Post

unlike what is going on here

1) They don't suppress free speech, unlike what is going on in our country. 2) They don't suppress free speech, like what is going on in our country. 3) They don't suppress free speech unlike what is going on in our country. 4) They don't suppress free speech like what is going on in our country. Which are grammatical, and correctly punctuated and logical? I heard something like '4' in a video I received. I can't post it. I don't like any of them, personally. I think they are all...Read More...

did - had

Hello. Which one is correct? - Now fewer children and mothers have health problems than they (had - did) 100 years ago. Thank youRead More...
Hi, David, Yes, I completely agree with you. In fact, this sentence is found in Sec 1 and it uses 'did'. I first read it as you did, then I thought that the writer uses 'they' to refer to 'children and mothers'. It is illogical to say that 'they' refers to 'fewer children and mothers' as the sentence will be meaningless then.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

present perfect with stative verbs & without durational phrase

Hi, I am confused about the meaning associated with the present perfect with stative verbs like "live" and "be" when they are not used with durational phrases. For example, (1) Mike has lived in Paris. (2) Mike has been in Paris. I know when you say "Mike has lived in Paris for two years," it means the same as "Mike has been living in Paris for two years. (he still lives in Paris)". The same is also true with "Mike has been in Paris for two days." What I am not sure is about sentences like...Read More...
Hi, Shmom—Present-perfect sentences with stative verbs can be interpreted in two different ways with or without a phrase specifying duration. "Mike has lived in / been in Paris for two years" can mean either (a) that the two-year period has extended up till the time of speech, in which case Mike is likely still (living) in Paris, or (b) that Mike has, sometime in the past, perhaps even decades ago, lived in or been in Paris for a two-year stretch of time. When we take out the phrase of...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

regret+doing

Can "regret doing' refer to the present? I regret not being genius. Possible? Or should it be "I regret that I am not genius"?Read More...
Hi, Me_IV, Neither sentence is correct. You mean "a genius" (where "genius" is a noun). (1) I regret not being a genius. (2) I regret that I am not a genius. The structure used by (1) refers to the past (compare: "I regret not being a Boy Scout when I was a kid"), whereas the structure used in (2) refers to the present. If you mean what (1) means, (1) is correct. If you mean what (2) means, (2) is.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Five-decades-long OR Five-long-decades?

I came across this sentence: In January 2013, President Raul Castro ended a five-decades-long policy on limiting international travel for Cuban citizens. Is that sentence grammatically correct?Read More...
Hi, EKW, and welcome to the G.E, No, it isn't. It should be 'decade' in the singular form, ( not decades) . It is a compound adjective here. David and Gustavo have asserted this point already. See here: https://thegrammarexchange.inf...1#595653434403800051Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

subjunctive mood

But that it rained a lot, we would not had worried so much. If it had not rained a lot, we would not had worried so much. Had it not rained a lot, we would not had worried so much. Are the sentences above grammatically correct?Read More...
Hi, Sarah Zhou—No, those sentences are not grammatically correct. Each one of them is ungrammatical. Modals are always followed by the base form of a verb. "Had" is the past tense of the verb "have." The base form of "have" is "have." Thus, while " would have . . . " is grammatical, " would had . . . " is not. If you changed "had" to "have," the second and third examples would be correct and equivalent. The first example, however, would remain ungrammatical. Although you can say " If it had...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Adjectives Modifying Nouns.

Dear Grammar Exchange, This is my first post as a member. Thank you for the opportunity of posting on this forum. I believe that transparency is key here. I am in the process of developing a name for a fictional ship. The name I have settled upon is Ardent Discovery. However, the development of this name has had me thinking about the relationship between the two words (the adjective modifying the noun) and I’ve come to a point where I can't see the wood for the trees, so to speak. Please...Read More...
That is very informative and very much appreciated. Thank you, kindly!Read More...
Last Reply By Jace777 · First Unread Post

Present perfect

I've read this sentence in King Lear: ( Since I've arrived here, I've heard some strange news) I know that we can use the present perfect directly after since if the verb is still going on or still has an effect but this does not go with ( arrive), so my question why is the present perfect with arrive in the above sentence? Thanks in advance.Read More...
No, it isn't right. It's unfortunate that the issue distorts Shakespeare's grammar. The past tense is needed in the "since"-clause, since the hearing of strange news did not extend throughout the period.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Shows and Showing

1. The ABC trust register shows the issue of 100 units to you. 2. The ABC trust register showing the issue of 100 units to you. What are the differences of the above two sentences? I saw my colleague wrote the second one, is it correct?Read More...
I wasn't just talking about "the ABC trust register showing." I was talking about the entirety of (2), every single word. It's one big noun phrase. It is not a sentence. In (2), "showing" could be replaced by " which shows."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Neither .. nor

Can I say, (a) He has neither studied for her maths exam nor science exam. (b) He has studied for neither her maths nor science exam. (c) He has studied neither for her maths nor science exam. Thanks.Read More...
No, bear_bear, you can't say any of those things. First, "he" doesn't go with "her." The possessive related to "he," as you know, is "his." Second, there needs to be grammatical parallelism when you use "neither . . . nor . . . ." Each term should introduce a phrase of the same type. Third, as a speaker of American English, I never use "maths." I recognize that British speakers are OK with "maths," but I can't stand the word. I use "math." He has studied neither for his math exam nor for his...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Help!

I was asked to proof a personal statement for a family member recently. They used the sentence "There are many reasons that encouraged my journey back into education". I suggested they rephrase, because the use or reasons and encouraged seemed odd to me. I wasn't really able to explain if it was truly poor grammar or which, if any, rules it might contravene. Can anyone help out?Read More...
Hello, Tonga, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. When you start a discussion thread here, please do not title it with the order "Help!" Choose a title that is descriptive of the grammatical topic of the thread. Here you could have used a title like "reasons that encouraged." The Grammar Exchange is not an editing service, but we can help you with this sentence. I agree with you that the use of "reasons" and "encouraged" is awkward. The sentence could be rephrased in many ways, but the...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

He's a rare bird, is Nick.

Hi all GE members and moderators, Can you please explain the grammar used in the sentence "He's a rare bird, is Nick"? I don't understand why "is Nick" is used in this way. Many thanks.Read More...

You may/might get into even worse trouble when...

1) You can get into even worse trouble when you're not careful. 2) You could get into even worse trouble when you're not careful. 3) You may get into even worse trouble when you're not careful. 4) You might get into even worse trouble when you're not careful. 5) You will get into even worse trouble when you're not careful. Does the "when-clause" in each sentence refer to the future (as in "when you're not careful in the future ")? Or Is each of sentences (1-5) a generic statement (timeless),...Read More...

The latter or The figure for the latter.

Hi Admin! In my essay, there is a sentence: "The percentages of people consuming meat and fish were 10% and 20% respectively. However, the former increased slightly while the latter declined." - I would ask about whether or not the word "the former" or "the latter" includes the meaning of "the percentage of people consuming meat". Or I have to write :" However, the figure for the former increased while the figure for the latter declined". Thank you for your consideration.Read More...
I'm sorry for not being clear. I mean "subsequent measurement was taken wherein the 10% grew to a larger percentage and the 20% deceased to a lower percentage". This is what i meant to say.Read More...
Last Reply By Moon Le · First Unread Post

Experience - a countable noun?

Hi all, my company has a new Vision Statement which ends with "...by delivering exceptional customer experience". This sounds wrong to me and I think it should be 'experiences' or 'an exceptional experience' because 'experience' in this context is a countable noun. Am I right?Read More...
Hi, Aimee—Yes, you are right. I find myself unable to hear "experience" as a noncount noun in the context of that phrase. "Experience" in a noncount sense is not something that can be delivered. Perhaps it would work with "creating"; however, I like your solution of making "experience" countable by using "an."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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