All Forum Topics

Featured Topics

Regarding the COVID-19 Pandemic

David, Moderator
Dear Grammar Exchange members, As we continue our grammar discussions, I want you to know that I am aware that we are all struggling in various ways as a result of the current pandemic and that my heart goes out to all of you. I hope that you and your loved ones are safe and healthy. Although we may not know each other personally, we all know that there is much more to us than the English grammar issues we discuss here. This post is devoted to the dimensions of you and your lives that I know...Read More...
Thank you David for your encouraging words.Read More...
Last Reply By Dr Ahmed · First Unread Post

Topics

Pro shop

Hi "I was shooting in the 70s and decided to become a golf pro. (This was when the Ladies Professional Golf Association was just about to open their headquarters in Daytona Beach.) I applied for the apprentice position working in the pro shop and got it. I think (pro) is the short form for (professsional). If so, did he apply for a job as a player to play or to work in the shop? My understanding of working in the pro shop is that he was selling something but not playing. My question about...Read More...

fell down his chair

Is this sentence correct: 1) The old man fell down his chair, dead. Does it mean he was dead when he fell or that he died as a result of the fall? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi—I've never heard of someone falling down a chair, but presumably this would be similar to falling down a flight of stairs. In a cartoon world, I suppose, we could imagine a chair big enough for someone to fall down. In the normal case, however, one does not fall down a chair. Rather, one may fall down from a chair or fall off (of) a chair. The sentence "The old man fell down from his chair, dead" represents him as having been dead when he fell.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

are in some form of sales?

Hi, It has been said that over 90 percent of people who make more than $100,000 a year are in some form of sales . I believe this is true. All of my multimillionaire friends and mentors work for profits. Not one of them works for wages. What does the highlighted part mean? Please rephrase the statement to be easy for me to understand. ThanksRead More...
Yes, the text you quoted seems to be encouraging entrepeneurship.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

The trauma will be...

What does this part of the sentence below mean? "for things to be the same/normal" ▪ The trauma will be too heavy for her for things to be the same/normal . Is the sentence below correct? If it's, what does it mean? I am confused about how this interrogative sentence below formed. Are two questions merged in one sentence? ▪ Where was she without me for this to even be possible?Read More...
Hi, Toaha, Thank you for including the source (Twitter). However, I deleted it because I found it offensive, especially towards the end. I know it was not your intention, but in future please abstain from publishing material (other than literature or news) expressing views which can hurt readers' feelings. Thank you. I will focus on your questions without making reference to the matter. - for things to be the same/normal means for the situation to get back to normal, to restore things as...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Associate with or Associate yourself with.

Do we need to add 'yourself/myself' when using 'associate' in a sentence? Does it change the meaning of the sentence? For example: - Don't associate with people below your standard./ I don't associate with criminals. - Don't associate yourself with people below your standard./ I don't associate myself with criminals.Read More...
What I said is that "associate oneself with" can also be used to mean "adhere to" or "support" (and this is when the object is not a person but a thing, as you can see in the examples), so the sentences above, using "associate (oneself) with somebody ," mean the same thing.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

grammar

Is this sentence correct, “I hope there to be mutual understanding”Read More...
Yes, you are quite right. I would like to add that this style is particularly common in business letters and it is like a polite order. In fact, the period attracted my attention when I was reading your enlightening response but l didn't realize your intended meaning then. Maybe that's because I have never used this style before or because I am an old-fashioned person.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

There is vs there are

__ an oven, a microwave and a fridge-freezer in the new apartment. 1) There is 2) There are Which one is correct in formal English? (Source; My Grammar Lab - B1-B2)Read More...
Hi, Freeguy, Normally, I would use 'there is' to agree with 'an oven'. I think this is how it should be used in formal exams. For more detailed information, see: https://thegrammarexchange.inf...here-is-or-there-areRead More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

We had found a niche in the industry

hi, "I resisted at first, but after a month or so I de- cided to give it a try because we were already selling ten futons for every one bedroom set and daybed. Guess what? We had found a niche in the industry and our income went up again! We were earning about $100,000 a year." Does the highlighted part mean (We had found what we were looking for in the industry)? What does (industry) mean here? ThanksRead More...
Definition of "industry" according to the Longman dictionary: business that produce s a particular type of thing or provide s a particular service Apparently nobody had thought of selling futons before, and by doing so the author found a niche in the furniture industry .Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

on the left / to the left?

If I am standing opposite to five people in which order are arranged from left to right: "Mary -> Sara -> Tom -> John -> Mat". Can I say: 1 Mary is on the left of John. 2 Mary is on the left side of John. 3 Mary is on the left hand side of John. 4 Mary is to the left of John. 5 Mary is to the left side of John. 6 Mary is to the left hand side of John. Thanks!Read More...
Thanks!Read More...
Last Reply By Kimconu · First Unread Post

nice truck?

hi "Going to the auction each week, I came to know a man who owned a used-furniture store. He drove nice trucks , owned a boat, and lived in a big house on several acres of land." What does (nice) mean here? What are the other adjectives that can be used instead of (nice) yet still serve the same intended meaning? In my opinion it has a close meaning to (good) but not (beautiful). What do you think?Read More...
Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

My nerves couldn’t handle it

Hi, "I took the PGA test for my pro card a couple of times but never broke 80. My nerves couldn’t handle it . So I set my sights on being a club pro." What is meant exactly by the highlighted part? In my opinion it is close to mean that he did not accept the result of the test.Read More...
Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

after high school I took up golf

Hi, "Somehow, when I was in high school, the conditioning of society got to me and I went looking for a job—because that’s what everyone said I should do. For nearly ten years I worked for wages and was never satisfied with the money I made. It always bothered me when I saw the amount of taxes taken out of each pay- check. During those ten years I did buy and sell a few other things to make extra money once in a while. For instance, after high school I took up golf . I can remember going to...Read More...
Crystal clear. Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

so was I

1) He was overjoyed when he heard the news. So was I. Could that mean: He was overjoyed when he heard the news. And I was overjoyed when I heard the news. (We didn't hear it at the same time.) Normally '1' would mean: ...I was happy when he heard the news. 2) He was surprised when he was shouted at. So was I. Could that mean: He was surprised when he was shouted at, and I was surprised when I was shouted at. Normally '2' would mean: .... I was surprised when I was shouted at. I think '1'...Read More...
Very interesting, Navi. I think that "So was I" can have either meaning in both sentences, and that it is context that will make the difference in interpretation. That said, I think that the meaning which you describe as "normal" will be the only interpretation, the unambiguous meaning, if the "when"-clause is fronted: 1a) When he heard the news, he was overjoyed. So was I. 2a) When he was shouted at, he was surprised. So was I.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Buy vs Buy off.

I know what buy means but I'm a little confused about 'buy off.' According to a dictionary it means 'to give someone money so that person will help you or let you do something that is not legal.' Is it like bribing? Can I say: - These people bought off the police. - To mean that they paid the police and now the police won't take any action against them for doing illegal business.Read More...
Thank you very much.Read More...
Last Reply By Ashraful Haque · First Unread Post

Have Vs Do

Why the sentence below use "have", instead of "do"? Why have deaths stayed steady while Covid-19 infections are spiking?Read More...
Hi, Joshua, This is called the present perfect tense. It links between the past and the present. It consists of verb 'to have' followed by the past participle (like 'have stayed' in your example). If this is a scientific fact, you can use the present simple tense. That's to say: 'Why do deaths stay steady while Covid-19 infections are spiking?'Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

He thought them to be indefensible.

Hi everyone, I came across the following sentence the book The Parliamentary Debates from the Year 1803 to the Present Time. He thought them to be indefensible. My question is, is it grammatical to add to be in this sentence? Thank you very much. MaoRead More...
Hi, Mao, That sentence is written in perfect English. According to Guide to Patterns and Usage in English by A. S. Hornby (note that the spelling he uses is British): (Where Hornby says "adjunct" above, I'd call it an object complement.) These are the examples the author provides: According to Hornby, this pattern is typical of rather formal style and is more usual in written than in spoken English, where that- clauses are preferred: - Most people considered (that) he was innocent. - All the...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

start adding up?

Hi "Millionaires don’t put much value on free ad- vice. Millionaires learn from people who have been there, done it, and are preferably still doing it. This is where your financial education expense will start adding up ." What does (this) refer to? What does (start adding up) mean in this context? What is the writer trying to say in the whole sentence ( This is where your financial education expense will start adding up.)? The meaning of the above senetence is not clear to me. ThanksRead More...
Sorry for the typo and thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

students of a successful life

hi " Millionaires are serious students of a successful life, not just financial success . They continually look for new ways of thinking and acting that can produce more fulfillment in their lives." Please rephrase the hilighted sentence above as I was not able to understand what the writer is trying to say. Just write the sentence in a plain way to make it easy for me to understnad. Thanks.Read More...
Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

Is this sentence okay?! If so what is the answer?!

I take hard exercise every day. It's useful .......... I get fitter and fitter. (in that - for which - in which - when)Read More...
Hi, Muhammad—Please give your threads meaningful titles, titles that will inform potential readers about the grammatical subject matter of the thread. The only answer choice that works is "in that": "I exercise hard every day. It's useful in that I get fitter and fitter." Do you understand the sentence?Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

How to punctuate sounds in creative writing?

hello everyone! I am working on ps right now, and i have a problem, in which i do not the right way to punctuate sounds in my essay; for example: the coming sentence is in my essay: “ Inhale! ” my chest gets higher. “ Exhale! ” my chest gets back. i want to give the sound of inhaling or exhaling and then describe what will happen next, which is the move of my chest. is this the right way or not? if not what is the right one so?Read More...
×
×
×
×