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January 2021

Is this sentence correct?

"We assisted a Brazilian IT multinational in their market entry strategy by providing them with a tailor-made & culture-based roadmap to hiring and retaining talent in Portugal" I have doubts about "roadmap to hiring and retaining talent". Can you help? Thanks! ElisaRead More...
Hello, Elisa, and welcome to GE. I agree with Ahmed that "with" may be better than "in," though "in" also works in my opinion. As regards "talent," Ahmed, I've heard and seen it used to mean "talented people." LDOCE says: 2 [ uncountable ] a person or people with a natural ability or skill I think "talent" works better there than "the talented" because the latter sounds like "only those who are talented," while "talent" is a wider concept.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Identifying the head of an NP

Hi. - Vaults full of research attest to how emerging-market optimism is more soundly based than rich-country pessimism. (The Economist) I view the first four words as an NP, with research being the head, "vaults full of" being something like a quantifier, because it is research that attest , not vaults . But why doesn't attest agree with research by using third person singular? What do I miss? Regards, Robby zhu.Read More...
Hi, Robby zhu, I agree with Ahmed that "vaults full of research" is the subject, and that the verb needs to agree with its head, which is the plural noun "vaults." In this noun phrase, "vaults full of" functions as a quantifier. If we had "large amounts of research," the verb would also need to be in the plural ( attest ). Perhaps it would have been more accurate to say: - The existence of vaults full of research attests to ... It it not actually the rooms full of documents that attest to...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Because of heave snow, my car should have got stuck in the snow.

Hi Because of heavy snow, my car should have got stuck in the snow. In the above sentence, should have P.P has the following usage? Oxford: should definition https://www.oxfordlearnersdict...lish/should?q=should Practical English USE 2 Past: ~~~.Read More...
Hi, TaeBbongE, Your sentence has no ambiguity or regret. The subject of your sentence is inanimate . An inanimate subject can't express regret. The owner of the car is just expressing a possibility .Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

“Compounding", gerund or present participle?

Hello, everyone! For one difficult sentence in following paragraph I’m wondering about its sentence structure; “ Compounding the difficulty, now more than ever, is what ergonomists call information overload ” How do you analysize the normal sentence of above before inversion or clefting, while I am assuming it as follows?; 1. before reversed pseudo clefting with ‘what’; “Ergonomists call compounding the difficulty information overload.” (S+V+O+C, ‘compounding’ as a gerund), or 2. before...Read More...

book

Is this sentence correct ? He called me up and said that they have all the rooms booked .Read More...
Hi, ilko, In this sentence. I see that you are trying to use the indirect speech and the passive causative. So, the tense of 'have' should be consistent with the other two verbs 'said' and 'called'.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

any and all vs anyone and everyone

Hi, I currently say "I have never wished that anyone, especially any and all of my family...." and I wonder if it is more accurate to say " I have never wished that anyone, especially anyone and everyone in my family....."?Read More...

“to which vs. where”

Hello, everyone!! As far as I understand, in informal style we often use ‘where’ to introduce defining relative clauses instead of ‘at/on/in which’ only. However, I’m a little confused to have found following two contradictory answers about the usage; “to which vs. where”. 1. “ The shop where he went ” is OK, or you can retain the unnecessary preposition and leave off the relative pronoun: “ the shop he went to ”. But “ the shop where he went to ” is too much. – American English, retired...Read More...

It was agreed that

During our meeting, it was agreed that the debt recovery action would be on hold for 1 year. Question 1: Why cant we say it was stated that, but we can say it was agreed that. 2. Is the sentence "it was agreed that" a passive voice?Read More...
I mean it is not mentioned who made the statement or the agreement. For there to be a matrix clause, there has to be a subordinate or dependent clause. In: - It was agreed / It was stated that .... "it was agreed / it was stated" is the matrix clause, and the "that"-clause is a subordinate or dependent clause. In: - It was eaten. there are no subordinate or dependent clauses, hence the structure is a simple sentence, not a matrix clause included in a complex sentence.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Proper Noun versus Common noun

Hello, I just wanted to confirm my understanding of the proper noun and common noun are correct based on my examples below. I have contacted Tony's mother [Tony's mother is a proper noun so you can't say the Tony's mother], I have contacted the Nurse's mother [The Nurse's mother is a common noun, so you can use "the" before the noun]. I went to t he Fiji Mountain in Japan before Covid hit us. I believe the Fiji mountain is a proper noun, comparable to Tony's mother but why it sounds okay to...Read More...
Yes, there "the cinema" (no capitals) is a common noun and needs an article. "18" is the item in the book. I kept it to be as faithful as possible in quoting the book.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.

"What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet. "This is a famous line from Shakespeare. I have no difficulty understanding this sentence. But I'm wondering whether the “which we call a rose by any other name ” is a relative clause or not. If it is a relative clause, what the function of the word"which"? I am looking forward for an answer. Thank you so much.Read More...
Thank you so much for your replies. This was the first time I posted a question on Grammar Exchange, even without high expectation. While you guys really surprised me by warm welcome and detailed explanations. Now I have a better understanding of the sentence structure and really appreciate your attention and efforts. I will share the wonderful Grammar Exchange with other ESL learners!Read More...
Last Reply By Winter · First Unread Post

AM or am

Should I use AM or am in the example below and what's the difference? He came her at 3.20 AM this afternoon to deliver a pizza for me.Read More...
Hi, Cristi—Your sentence is a contradiction in terms. The time 3:20 a.m. is a time in the morning, namely, three hours and twenty minutes past midnight. If you wish to refer to "three hours and twenty minutes past noon," use "3:20 p.m." You can punctuate the numbers and letters in accordance with local custom.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

The double possessive

What is the difference between: - He is a friend of mine, - He is my friend, and - He is a friend of me? Thanks.Read More...
Hello, May123—I assume you mean to ask about differences in meaning rather than differences in syntax. "He is a friend of mine" means he is one of my friends, and that is how "He is my friend" would also be understood. However, the sentence "He is my friend" would also be compatible with a state of affairs in which the speaker had only one friend. "He is a friend of me" is unidiomatic and not to be used. The construction works in other cases, though. "Friends of John" might be used at John's...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Singular or plural

I have put a tender for external suppliers to provide cleaning services for my building and conduct a monthly fire inspection. All suppliers are required to put through applications and submissions why they are preferred supplier and I am required to make decision to whom: [1 decision] - outsource the cleaning job [2nd decision] to decide who will give the job for the monthly fire inspections. At the end of the process, I am required to issue reasons for our decisions or reasons for decision...Read More...
Because "decision" is a count noun and requires an article or some other determiner.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

It is (hight/about) time (that) + Subject + Simple past tense verb

I have learned the following structure from Practical in Use. <It is (hight/about) time (that) + S + Simple past tense verb> This is regarding Subjunctive mood Now I am curious about the last sentence can be possible or not. It is (high/about) time (that) we went to bed. (O) = It is (high/about) time for us to go to bed. (O) = It is ( high /about) time (that) we should go to bed. (???)Read More...
Although the other forms are possible, I agree with David when he said in that thread:Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Meeting you

Assuming I just met someone and after going, I need to email them. Do I say, it was nice to have met up with you this afternoon or it was nice meeting you this afternoon. What is the difference in meaning?Read More...
I have heard both but not sure which one is more grammatical and whether there is a difference in meaning? ThanksRead More...
Last Reply By Cristi · First Unread Post

I feel amazing

Hello friends, I’d like to discuss this sentence: “I feel amazing.” I quite often hear native speakers say this and (1) I believe it’s grammatically acceptable but wonder if it has ever been controversial grammarwise. (2) I believe that it simply means “I feel great / wonderful / excellent” as “amazing” is a synonym of these words and that it doesn’t mean “I feel that I am amazing” and definitely not “I feel amazed”. If it means “I feel that I am amazing”, we can likewise say “I feel...Read More...
One meaning of "amazing," according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is "great beyond expectation." "I feel amazing" basically means "I feel wonderful": "I feel so good I could say WOW," "My feelings right now are amazing to me," "My feelings are amazingly good," "I am amazed at how good I feel." Although it isn't nearly so commonly used, it is possible to say "I feel interesting" with the meaning "I feel peculiar" or "I'm not really sure how I feel."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Grammar

Are the below sentences grammatically correct? If so, why? 1. Once received, we will process your application? 2. Once we have received, we will process ... 3. Once it is received, we will... What is the difference of each? 1. passive? 2. also passive? 3. present? Thanks so much for your time!Read More...
"Received" in "once received" is a past participle. It derives from the passive form "once it is received ."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

might have left the country

Which are correct: 1) We don't know where he is. He might have left the country. 2) We don't know where he is. He could have left the country. 3) It was fortunate we didn't go mountain climbing. We might have died in that avalanche. 4) It was fortunate we didn't go mountain climbing. We could have died in that avalanche. Gratefully, NaviRead More...

meaning

I've come across this sentence here: "I’m quite far in my medical school time so I don’t have lots of free time but I can still have some quality time with my family and friends", but I'm not sure I understand this first part: "I’m quite far in my medical school time". Does it mean that he has just started medical school, and it's gonna still take him a long time to graduate? I'll appreciate if you can help me to clarify this sentence. Thank you so much! All the best.Read More...
Yes, that's right. Think of a timeline as a road along which one can travel far.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

any talk

a. Any talk about politics is not allowed at this offic e. Is the above sentence grammatically correct? I think it's not correct. It seems to me that it should be b. No talk about politics is allowed at his office. or c. Any talk about politics is disallowed at this office. How about b. Anyone under sixteen is not allowed inside the room. ? Many thanks.Read More...
Hi, Azz, In my experience as a translator and a lecturer, I have only encountered "any" in the subject combined with negative verbs in legal texts. Sentences such as the ones you propose: are correct at least in legalese.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

In/of/at

Which one is correct? I mean which preposition I should use here. 1- All the students of this school are hereby notified that a cultural programme will be organised next month. 2- All the students at this school are hereby notified that a cultural programme will be organised next month. 3- All the students in this school are hereby notified that a cultural programme will be organised next month.Read More...
Hi, Subhajit—All three prepositions are correct. You can use whichever you like.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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