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October 2020

either

Hello. What's wrong with the following sentence? - She has met either of the two couples. Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, The sentence above makes no sense. You can say: - She has met one of the two couples. - She has met neither of the two couples. - She has not met either of the two couples. "either" is equivalent to "any" but refers only to two, while "any" refers to more than two. We also cannot say: * She has met any of the three couples. (incorrect) We can say: - She has met one of the three couples. - She has met none of the three couples. - She has not met any of the three couples. The...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

"all-staff trainings" or "all staff trainings"

"I, moreover, trained my coworkers in this skill by assisting with all-staff trainings." Did I use the hyphen correctly? I want to say that I assisted with trainings that all of the staff attended. So, I did not assist with all training of the staff, but merely with all-staff trainings. I'm not sure if I'm following the rule, "If each of the words can modify the noun without the aid of the other modifying word or words, do not use a hyphen," properly. I could say, "...assisting with all...Read More...
Thanks Dave. In the future, I will assist other people on this forum with their questions as well. I'm just under the gun right now applying to grad school for technical communication. I don't want you to think that I won't contribute around here.Read More...
Last Reply By GreenThunderBolt · First Unread Post

The use of the phrase "corresponding"

Have I used the word corresponding correctly in the sentence below. The table below shows the deposits you received in the 2020 income year and the corresponding source. Date Amount Source of the deposit 1/01/2020 $10K Deposit matured 15/02/2020 $50K Gift from mum 30/06/2020 $100K Gift from dadRead More...
Perhaps they do so to make it almost painfully obvious that the items in the one column stand in a relationship of correspondence with the items in the other.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

unchanged from

1) No person will be unchanged from living through this present hardship. Ivanka Trump says that in some sort of address. Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z4ebSsN19tg From 1:00 to 1:07 approximately. 2) He was changed from living through that experience. 3) He changed from living through that experience. Are '1', '2' and '3' grammatical? Are they idiomatic? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi—I think all three examples would strongly benefit from changing "from" to "after," though that change is perhaps grammatically imperative only in (3), which I think makes no sense at all. Here's another way of revising (1): (1a) No person will survive this present hardship unchanged.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Rather than + infinitive or ing form

Do I say? Rather than make a minimum repayment I will just pay off the whole amount or rather than making a minimum repayment I will just pay off the whole amount ?Read More...
It is possible for "rather than " to be followed by the base form of a verb, which is not the same as "to" + [base form of a verb], or by the ING form. In order to be followed by the base form of a verb, "rather than" needs to be related to a verb phrase headed by the base form of a verb. This is incorrect: I just paid off the whole thing rather than make a minimum payment. But you can say: I just paid off the whole thing rather than making a minimum payment.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

How to use another,the other.

There are 5 pens. 5 children choose each one of them. Then they say: Child No1. I take this. Child No.2 I take another. Child No.3 I take another. Child No.4 I take another. Child No.5 I take ? What should the last child say? the rest one the other another Best regardsRead More...
Dear David and Gustavo, Thank you very much for your advice. "Grammar Exchange " is very, very helpful for me. Usually,I look up "English Grammar Today" published by Cambridge University Press to find correct answers to grammatical questions. But this time,the grammar book didn't give me any answers. Not only the book,but also any other books didn't. Sincerely yours, YapRead More...
Last Reply By yap · First Unread Post

The "who or whom" question, again

I know to use "whom" for when this pronoun is used as a direct object and to use "who" when this pronoun is used as a subject. Nevertheless, I'm always unsure of when to use "who" or "whom." Which of the following sentences should I use? "I hope to further my academic training with ASU's prestigious faculty, who/whom obtained national and international recognition for their achievements." "I hope to further my academic training with ASU's faculty. Faculty who obtained national and...Read More...
Thank you!Read More...
Last Reply By GreenThunderBolt · First Unread Post

Colon or Semi Colon

Hello Would you write I bought ten apples: five red and five green Or I bought ten apples; five red and five green ThanksRead More...
I agree with Ahmed_btm that a colon works well. A comma would also work in this case. "I bought ten apples, five red and five green." A couple of other punctuation possibilities could also be given. However, the most important point here is that it would be incorrect to use a semicolon.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

really/ very much

Hi there, Can someone please tell me if I can use "really" instead of "very much" in this sentence? If not, why?: “It was very much run like a junior hockey operation where there weren't many resources to hire staff..." So, can we use "really", "a lot" or "very much" when modifying a verb? Thanks a bunchRead More...
thank you so muchRead More...
Last Reply By JessyA · First Unread Post

may/ may be able to

1) A vegetarian diet may not provide enough calories for a child's normal growth. 2) A vegetarian diet may not be able to provide enough calories for a child's normal growth. Are they the same or different?Read More...
Hi, Language learner, I agree with David that "may not be able" is more emphatic than "may not." As I see it, while "may not" only expresses negative probability, "may not be able" also adds the idea of ability or capability: It may be the case that a vegetarian diet is not capable of providing enough calories for a child's normal growth.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Do I need commas here

In the following sentence, do I need to include the commas or can I leave them out: I encountered an older male presenting with, what I considered to be, an open and shut case for histoplasmosis. (Also, should I include hyphens within "open and shut", so that it would be "open-and-shut", or should I leave as is?)Read More...
Hi, bibi9, and welcome to GE. Although I wouldn't say it is incorrect to keep the article, my impression is that if you want to use the superlative (rather than use most important to mean extremely important ), then it would be clearer to include the pronoun "ones" after "the most important" to refer to "(histopathological and gross) findings." By the way, next time you ask a question that is not in any way related to the previous one from a grammatical point of view (that is, even if both...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Indefinite article

Do we say: ''much of a muchness' means that there is little difference between two things'', or ''Much of muchness' means that there is little difference between two things''? Also, do we say: 'We haven't hope of catching the train now', or 'We haven't a hope of catching the train now'? Thanks.Read More...
I you can't improve upon * much of (a) muchness , I won't provide an answer.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

I did not know/ I have not known the answer

Hello, Sir. Could you please tell me if the following sentence is grammatically correct? I know the fact it is recommended that we use present perfect to refer to an action that was completed in the very recent past. However, according to some sites we cannot use ''know'' in this way. How terrifying this course has been. Our teacher has put us questions regarding the course materials that we were supposed to have read. I have not known the answer to one of her questions. So, should I use ''I...Read More...
Hello, Schianu—In that context, you can indeed use the sentence you have used: "I have not known the answer to one of her questions." It works much better than the version with "did not know," which does not fit the intended meaning in the context. Here are a couple of other ways you can put the idea: I haven't been able to answer one of her questions. There is not one question she has asked that I have known the answer to.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

How can I write this email?

My brother was texting someone on messenger to ask him about an available job for me, and that one told my brother there an available job in the CS department. Due to this, I have to send him my CV attached in email and he will forward my CV to a recruiter, but I have no idea what I should write in that email? Thanks in advanceRead More...
Hello, Em2, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Unfortunately, we cannot teach you how to write an email. You should try and find some blog on the Internet which contains suggestions as to how to send a résumé by email. You can come back here to ask us any specific doubt you may have about grammar or language. Good luck!Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

In the 2020 income year and during the 2020 income year

I received 4 parental payments during the 2020 income year. I received 4 parental payments in the 2020 income year. Is there a difference in meaning the above 2 sentences?Read More...
I don't see a difference a substantial difference in meaning. In both cases you have received 4 payments in total within one year.Read More...
Last Reply By Openmind · First Unread Post

On application I write "I, Sushanta Majhi, a student of your school state that" so is it correct? should am be used as helping verb in-place of a?

On application I write "I, Sushanta Majhi, a student of your school state that" so is it correct, should am be used as helping verb in-place of a.Read More...
Hello, Evil , and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Next time you publish a post, please do not include the whole question in the title. Try to provide a more concise title, for example "Is 'am' necessary here?," and then write the question inside the box. That said, I understand that you want to use "state" as a verb, right? In that case, "a student of your school" (also "a student at your school") is an apposition and the verb be is not required. Actually, there are two appositions: I,...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Inferring grammatical unit class based on the coordinating conjunction.

Hi, Everyone, Reading a discussion paper on Coercive control ( Australia, NSW Communities and Justice, pg4, item 1.2 ) it states: "DFV is complex and often characterised by repeated patterns of behaviour that can be physical or non-physical in nature." Given that "complex" can be both an adjective and a noun, we can confirm that "complex" is indeed being used as a noun by the presence of the word "characterised" due to the "and" coordination conjunction? Many thanks, PhilipRead More...
Hi, David, Updated URL . You answer makes it very easy to identify it as an adjective, thank you.Read More...
Last Reply By Philip · First Unread Post

Participial phrases as adverbs vs. adjectives

I'm wondering how to label the construction here: "Tom raced back out of the house, holding a long leash ." Is "holding a long leash" modifying "raced" or "Tom"? Does the answer to this question determine whether the comma is essential? My current thinking is that the comma in "Tom raced back out of the house, holding a long leash" is proper if the phrase is operating adverbially, but "Tom raced back out of the house holding a long leash" is proper if the phrase is adjectival, modifying...Read More...
Hi, iankms, Participial clauses like "holding a long leash" are always adverbial unless they follow a noun, in which case they are adjectival: - The man holding a long leash is a dog walker. I think such clauses can only be adjectival and will not take a comma if placed after a state verb, for example: - Tom looked threatening holding a long leash. My understanding is that the comma will be omitted if the participle describes the manner in which the action is performed, and will be required...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Reported Speech: Backshifting or not?

Hello, so I was preparing some reported speech exercises for my little brother and stumbled upon this multiple choice one: Tom said, "New York is more crowded than London". He said that New York was more crowded than London. He says that New York is more crowded than London. He says that New York was more crowded than London. He said that New York is more crowded than London. Obviously 2 and 3 are down and out, so we're left with 1 backshifting and 4 keeping it original . New York is still...Read More...
Hi, Imbadatgames, and welcome to the G.E, As you mentioned above, there are two possible answers here '1' & '4'. In an exam '4' sounds more normal than '1' as it shows it is a matter of fact now. '2' & '3' don't work because your sentence (in the direct speech) uses 'said' in the past simple. It is noticeable that when such questions are inserted in an exam, the exam maker always tries to provide well-known factual information so that the time backshift becomes unnecessary. However,...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post
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