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October 2020

the way people dress is responsible for sexual assaults.

I asked a friend of mine the following question: "Do you think the way people dress is partly responsible for sexual harassment/ assault ?" I have two questions about the sentence: 1) I've used responsible for people only but not objects. Is 'responsible' correct here? 2) I've looked up 'sexual assault s ' but it's always singular. What if I want to talk about more than one assaults? For example: "There have been several sexual assaults over the last few days."Read More...
Thank you for the answer. I think singular (sexual assault) fits my context better.Read More...
Last Reply By Ashraful Haque · First Unread Post

not unusual

1) It is not unusual to be loved by anyone. That's from a famous Tom Jones song (I am sure you recognize it). The song is called 'It's Not Unusual'. https://genius.com/Tom-jones-its-not-unusual-lyrics What does '1' mean? How about: 2) It is not impossible to be loved by anyone. In those sentences, does 'anyone' mean 'no matter what person' or 'everyone'? I think that the meaning they were going for was: 3) There is nobody being loved by whom would be strange. 4) There is nobody whose loving...Read More...

Clause-complexes with inversion

Rocío
Hello, everyone . This is my first post. I'm from Argentina and I'm an English translator to be. I want to thank you in advance for helping me. I was doing some homework when I came across the following situation: I had to analyse the following clause-complex, which is made up of two clauses conected by "nor". They have not learned to read , nor do they have the expectation of delight or improvement from reading. My doubt is if the clause following "nor" is a dependent or an independent...Read More...
Congratulations, Rocío, on studying at one of the best universities in the country. There are job opportunities in both fields of translation, so you will have plenty of work whichever you choose. At Universidad de Buenos Aires, where I graduated as a sworn translator, I used to teach Translation I (general translation). At Lenguas Vivas, where I graduated as a literary and technical-scientific translator long ago, I now teach Economic-Financial Translation and Introduction to the...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Analysis of clause-complex + Independent and dependent clauses

Rocío
Hello, everyone!! I was doing my homework about clause-complex analysis when I came across this sentence that I don't know how to solve. I will show you the sentences and what I considered it was right. " In the Finish Myth , the sun came from an egg yolk, whereas in the Micronesian myth, the sun was a snail." I divided this sentence this way: "1(In the Finish myth), 2(the sun came from an egg yolk), whereas 3( in the Micronesian myth ), (the sun was a snail)." This is my analysis (it is...Read More...
Hello, David! Now I see . Thank you very much for taking the time to answer it. The examples are very clear; I completely understood it when you rearranged the sentences. I had this problem because my classmates and I are currently studying ranking clauses (independent and dependent ones), and our teacher told us that adverbial clauses can be: Finite clauses: " Although prices are high, customers flock to the restaurant" Non-finite clauses: " Working hard, I was able to improve my...Read More...
Last Reply By Rocío · First Unread Post

Apply/ Apply for/ Apply to

I apply engineer as I want to serve people. I apply for engineer as I want to serve people. I apply to engineer as I want to serve people. Which one is correct in job application? Thank youRead More...
Hi, mooninsky538, You apply for the job / position of engineer, so none of the sentences above is correct.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Any advice or mistakes

1.I have to handle building services repair work such as replacing the defective alarm inside the housing estate. 2.I have to monitor the performance of contractors during the cleaning of water tanks and lift machine room routine inspection. Any advice or mistakes for the above 2 sentences ? Thank you.Read More...
Hi, mooninsky538, The same comment I made in another post of yours applies here.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Improve the sentence/ any mistakes

I have to handle water supply problems such as bad water quality. Any advice or mistakes for the above sentence ? Thank you.Read More...
Hi, mooninsky538, There are no mistakes in your sentence above. Please note that we are not a proofreading service, so we tend to frown upon thread titles like Improve the sentence, Any mistakes?, Any advice? , which ask us to proofread the text in question for you. We would prefer it if you focused on some lexical or grammatical issue rather than pose an open question like the ones above.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Comma

Why it has no comma before and after "over the week"? Trump's actions over the week provoked a round of politically damaging headlines and left him without what could have been a valuable opportunity to improve on his first showing against Biden in a debate next week. https://edition.cnn.com/2020/1...den-trump/index.htmlRead More...
Hi, Joshua. I'm not a grammarian but an English student. Anyway, I hope my answer will help you understand it. I think that maybe when you read the text, you thought that "over this week" was an adverbial expressing time and not a postmodifier of "Trump's actions", which is why it isn't separated by a comma. The writer is not talking about Trump's actions in general, but the ones that took place that week.Read More...
Last Reply By Rocío · First Unread Post

while + ~ing

Hello, Grammar Exchange members! I've been wondering what the omitted subject after "while" is in the following sentence. 1. Progress consists of unbundling the features of a social process as much as we can to maximize the human benefits while minimizing the harms. Initially I thought that "we're" is omitted but as the subject in the main clause is "progress," I thought that "progress is" could be the omitted subject and verb. But the problem is "progress is minimizing the harms" doesn't...Read More...
Thank you, David. Crystal clear explanation!Read More...
Last Reply By KDog · First Unread Post

Time of the day= whole 24 hours?

This is an IELTS question on magoosh: "What time of day do you like the most? Why?" I wanted to say something like this: "My favorite time is nighttime. It's because I can focus better on anything since there are less distractions......" But I'm a bit confused about 'time of the day .' Does it mean the whole 24 hours or just the time between sunrise and sunset?Read More...
I see. Thank you so much.Read More...
Last Reply By Ashraful Haque · First Unread Post

as I did

Are these sentences correct: 1) I read your article as I did John's. 2) I listened to your song as I did John's. 3) I read your article , as I did John's. 4) I listened to your song , as I did John's. I think in '1' and '2' the act was done in the same manner, and in '3' and '4', the manner is not the issue, and the idea is simply that the same thing was done. Is that correct? Gratefully, NaviRead More...

Then this whole annoying, ghastly illness can go away

1) Hold your breath till we get there. It’s just another six months. It’s only till there is a vaccine and that will be before spring, right? Then this whole annoying, ghastly illness can go away. Well, yes, maybe, except that it isn’t quite that simple. ( A rushed vaccine could do far more damage than Covid ) Does the underlined sentence mean (especially concerned about the "can"): After a vaccine is developed, it will be possible for the disease to go away.Read More...
Yes, that's right. It's similar to waiting for a vaccine for the coronavirus.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

had to, must in reported speech

Hello Which one is correct? - He said he (had to - must) train for many years to be ready for the journey. Thank you.Read More...
Hello, Ahmed Imam Attia—More information is needed about the context in order to decide which one is correct. If the journey that he was talking about is a journey that has already taken place, then only "had to" works. Another possibility in that case is "had had to," which uses backshifted reported speech. "Must" does not work if the journey being referred to has already taken place. If the journey that he was talking about is a journey that will take place in the future, then both choices...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

called into & grievsnce-filled

What does it mean "called into" and "grievsnce-filled" ? Trump called into right-wing radio host Rush Limbaugh's program for a grievance-filled interview. https://edition.cnn.com/2020/10/10/politics/2020-election-biden-trump/index.htmlRead More...
Hi, Joshua—"He called into the program" means that he placed a call to the radio station so that he could be heard being interviewed by Rush Limbaugh, a famous radio talk-show host. "A grievance-filled interview" means "an interview filled with grievances"; during the interview, he expressed many grievances.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

already & playing

The word of "already" is indicating past tense, why does it follow with "playing"? With Trump already playing a weak hand, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, at home in Kentucky, cast doubt on the possibility that Republicans would pass any deal in time for the election. https://edition.cnn.com/2020/10/10/politics/2020-election-biden-trump/index.htmlRead More...
Hi, Joshua—"Playing" is tenseless in that sentence. It is a nonfinite verb. The writer could, however, have written "With Trump having already played " instead. That said, "having played" is unnecessary, because "already" indicates that Trump's playing a weak hand occurred before McConnell's casting doubt.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Am I right to use the adverb 'harrowingly' in the following example?

Hi, I've recently written and submitted an article to an editor, but whilst reading it back over I became worried that I maybe should've used the adjective 'harrowing' instead of the adverb 'harrowingly'. It certainly sounds and feels right to me to use the latter, but it may of course be grammatically wrong! The extract is as follows (apologies for the bleak subject matter!): 'And most harrowingly of all, reports of forced sterilization have emerged, indicating a calculated attempt to...Read More...
Excellent. Thank you both so much for your insightful, informative analysis. I can now have peace of mind knowing that I was using- or at least attempting to use- a disjunct! All the best, CameronRead More...
Last Reply By Cameron Boyle · First Unread Post

thirty four in all?

The coronavirus outbreak has infected "34 White House staffers and other contacts" in recent days, according to an internal government memo, an indication that the disease has spread among more people than previously known in the seat of American government. Source: https://www.yahoo.com/gma/34-people-connected-white-house-235300262.html Is that 34 people in all or 34 staffers plus other contacts? I suppose it is 34 in all, but it is not clear. If I went by grammar, I'd say 34 staffers plus...Read More...
Hello, Navi—Grammar allows for either interpretation. That the intended reading is grammatically possible can be seen by considering phrases like " 34 boys and girls " ( likely reading: 34 children, some boys, some girls ; possible alternate reading: 34 boys plus an unmentioned number of girls ) and " 34 young men and women " ( likely reading: 34 adults, some men, some women, all young ; possible alternate reading: 34 young men, plus an unmentioned number of adult females of an unmentioned...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Grammar Term and Explanation

Can anyone let me know what grammar term describes the 3 adjectives in the sentence? I believe it's an elliptical noun phrase, but am not sure. Also, does anyone know a website that explains this grammar point? Thank you! Original, imaginative, and almost fantastic describe the techniques of Dali's paintings.Read More...
Thank you for your explanation!Read More...
Last Reply By susanm 2 · First Unread Post

“to be” after the verb “need”

1) I need you to be here right now. 2) I need you here right now. Can we remove "to be" appearing after the verb "need" in this way? Are the following correct? To a waiter in a restaurant: 3) Excuse me, I need some sauce in it. 4) Excuse me, I need some sauce to be in it.Read More...
Yes, but I was only speaking of a preference I have. There is nothing grammatically incorrect about the sentence that you have preceded with "NOT."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Question

Please tell me if the sentence below is written correctly. “I began walking along the rode. I had been resting on the bench when my watch pointed 5 minutes before my breaks over. “ Thank you, NaokiRead More...
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