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October 2021

Relative clause

Su's
Hello, I don't know if this sentence is grammartically correct. " I am Suzie, a freshman from X University, whose major is IT." * Note: + This is the whole sentence, I wonder if I have used relative clause effectively and whether it is a fragment sentence. + This sentence is a part of an introduction, so there are many sentences coming after this one. It's not a whole paragraph. Thank you so much.Read More...
I view the "whose" relative clause as restrictive and would not use the comma. It modifies "freshman." Consider this dialogue: A: "Do you know any freshmen from X University whose major is I.T. ?" B: "Yes. I know one freshman from X University whose major is I.T. Her name is Suzie." Incidentally, there is a much easier way of saying "I am Suzie, a freshman from X University whose major is I.T." I am Suzie, a freshman I.T. major at X University.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

get

1) I got the door open 2) I got the door opened 3) I got the door to be opened Which ones are interchangeable? Could you let me know what are the differences among them? Thanks.Read More...
Your explanation makes my understanding easy. Thank you so much.Read More...
Last Reply By Dude · First Unread Post

accompany

This is similar to the previous question about the "accompany." Then, which one does it make sense? or Are both not correct, either? 1) An opportunity accompanies a responsibility. 2) A responsibility accompanies an opportunity.Read More...
Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By Dude · First Unread Post

Swamped

Hi, Can I use the following two sentences interchangeably without changing its meaning? I swamped with works (In-transitive verb) I got swamped with works (Transitive verb)Read More...
Hi, Cristi—"Swamped with work" is basically an adjectival passive. Nobody talks about who swamped whom or about whom someone was swamped by. The point is just that somebody is swamped. The plural form does not refer to stuff you have to do, not even emphatically. "Works" refers to things already accomplished and therefore makes absolutely no sense in that context.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

restrictive or non-restrictive

In the third sentence in "A," there isn't a comma after "my parents" even though it is a specific noun. Ordinarily, "who were on a waiting list" would be a non-restrictive clause. Although I've forgotten, someone told me that there isn't a comma after "parent" because it has something to do with the word "so" that begins the sentence. In sentence "B," the noun, Guion, is a proper noun which should make the relative clause, "who later became an astronaut," non-restrictive. "Guion...Air Force"...Read More...
Ok, thanks, David!!Read More...
Last Reply By clueless · First Unread Post

In case if

Can I put the word "if" after the word in case? For example: Can you pass on this information to your director in case if they need our services. or Can you pass on this information to your director in case they need our servicesRead More...
Hi, Cristi, I agree with Ahmed. The only possibility to use two conjunctions together is that they are different and coordinated (e.g. if and where ), or that, even if similar, they are at different syntactic levels (as is the case when one condition is inside another): - Can you pass on this information to your director in case, if they need our services , they decide to call us?Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

The same as

Which is wrong? 1- We are the same age. 2- We are of the same age. 3- We have the same age. 4- We are not at the same age. I think only no.3 is wrong because ( have ) with ( the same ) expresses possession، and we don't possess our age.Am I right? Thanks in advance.Read More...
Native speakers say: "We're the same age." I parse it as having an omitted "of."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

subject-verb agreement

The Accessibility of Information For many centuries European science , and knowledge in general, was recorded in Latin—a language that no one spoke any longer and that had to be learned in schools. Very few individuals, probably less than 1 percent, had the means to study Latin enough to read books in that language and therefore to participate in the intellectual discourse of the times. Moreover, few people had access to books, which were handwritten, scarce, and expensive. Can I use...Read More...
Sometimes it helps to read a sentence out loud to yourself to better understand its structure. I feel that the words "and knowledge in general" are parenthetical. That is to say, they are words that are thrown into the sentence to express an extra comment that is not absolutely necessary to the main idea of the sentence. I believe that your sentence could even be written like this: "For many centuries European science (and knowledge in general) was recorded in Latin." "For many centuries...Read More...
Last Reply By TheParser · First Unread Post

should

A. It is important she should know what it is. B. It is important she knows what it is. Are (A) and (B) the same?Read More...
That's absolutely right, TheParser. Although you have only just begun posting here as TheParser, I want to invite you to go ahead and speak your mind freely. Don't ever worry about being wrong here. I am confident that, if you have something to say, it is worth being said. I am very happy that you have joined.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

a question of 'themselves'

A following expression: " Allow children time to explore ways of handling and playing the instruments for themselves before show them." 1. Which does it ,'themselves' mean?, children or instruments? 2. If it means children, why is the last word , 'them' used instead of 'themselves'?Read More...
Yes, "themselves" refers to "children." No. "Children" is the implied subject of "to explore," "handling," and "playing."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Relative pronoun

I'm wondering this answer sounds funny for me. Make the two sentences into one by using a relative pronoun. 1) My father made me a cake. The cake was delicious. The answer is : My father made me a cake which was delicious. Could you give me some advice?Read More...
Thank you, TheParser and Marcus Britton, for your helpful contributions to this thread. Marcus, I welcomed you in the thread of yours in which I just posted a reply. Here, I wish to extend a very warm welcome to TheParser. Indeed, Americans do have that preference. I sometimes take the liberty of beginning a restrictive relative clauses with "which" (cf. FDR's "a date which will live in infamy"), but I do so knowing that "that" is commonly used instead. My sense is that, if a comma is used...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

prepositional phrases as appositive phrases

I'm a college instructor (in sociology, not English), and I try to encourage my students to use correct grammar and punctuation whenever I can. Today, I came across the following sentence in a student's paper: "I as a child protective specialist will need to be constantly aware of new strategies and practices that will keep the children I work with safe and comfortable." In this sentence, "as a child protective specialist" is a prepositional phrase. My question is whether it also a...Read More...
Makes sense! Thanks!Read More...
Last Reply By Marcus Britton · First Unread Post

before

GOOD MORNING <3 I went to France last year. I (have never been - had never been) to a foreign country before. When I read the second sentence sometimes I get the feeling that 'before' means 'before now (the moment of speaking)', so I choose 'have never been'. However, when I re-read 'before', I wonder if it means 'before the specified time mentioned in the first sentence, i.e. last year', and so I think of 'had never been' as the correct choice. If you can help understand what 'before'...Read More...
Hi, Rasha Assem, Nice to see you and your enlightening questions here again. Regarding your question, I see that means: - I had never been to a foreign country before I went to France last year. Using 'I have never been to a foreign country before' is relevant to the present, so it doesn't need another action in the past.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Look forward to being of service

I received an invoice from my supplier and at the end of paragraph it states I look forward to being of service. What does it mean I look forward to being of service?Read More...
David, that makes a nice group I had never been really aware of, to which we can add be of use and be of note.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

magnificently dressed

Which are correct: 1) He committed an act lawful according to the laws of the state he was in. 2) We are talking about the acts lawful according to the laws of our country. 3) I talked to a woman tall and beautiful. 4) I talked to a woman magnificently dressed. 5) I talked to the woman tall and beautiful. 6) I talked to the woman magnificently dressed. Gratefully, NaviRead More...

When and the past simple

Adham was returning home late ........ a dog bit him. (when-while-until-as soon as) The provided answer is when. But I can't figure out the meaning of the sentence. I mean the sentence should be: A dog bit Adham when he was returning. The dog bit him during his return not his return was when the dog bit him. Am I right? ThanksRead More...
Wow! Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzathanna · First Unread Post

Shareholder and shareholding

Both of the above two words are "noun". Can I say the shareholding of ABC Pty Ltd is owned 100% by Michael? Please note I wanted to use the word shareholding instead of shareholder. Many thanks!!!Read More...
Hi, Tony, You are right that both "shareholder" and "shareholding" are noun s . "Shareholder" is the person, or entity, who holds shares, and "shareholding" is the holding, or possession, of shares. It would be better to say: - 100% of ABC Pty Ltd's shareholding is owned by Michael. or - 100% of ABC Pty Ltd's shares are owned by Michael. You can also say: - Michael owns a 100% shareholding in ABC Pty Ltd. - Michael owns 100% of the shares of ABC Pty Ltd.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Fronted

Longman Online Dictionary A . Try as she might, Sue couldn’t get the door open. B. As she might try, Sue couldn’t get the door open. Is (A) the same as (B)? Then, how is it possible for "Try" to be fronted?Read More...
No, they are not the same. Please note that the first "as" is an intensifier that could be eliminated or replaced with another intensifier, while the second "as" is equivalent to "though": 1. As popular as he is, the president hasn’t always managed to have his own way. ( Although the president is very/quite popular, he hasn’t always managed to have his own way.) 2. Popular as he is, the president hasn’t always managed to have his own way. ( Although the president is popular, he hasn’t always...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post
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