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October 2022

Said + noun

Hi, I wonder how often can we repeat something that has already mentioned in the previous paragraph(s) using the word "said + noun"). Below is my example: I have two significant transactions occurred in 2020 income year, a buy back and a redemption of redeemable preference shares. The said transactions were in relation to my shares held in ABC company. In January 2021, I purchased additional shares when the company share price dropped dramatically. I have calculated the profit that I made...Read More...
It is wrong to say "I HAVE two significant transactions OCCURRED," because 1) "have" should be "had" (in the past tense) and 2) "occur" is an intransitive verb and should not be used as an transitive verb in Pattern "to have + NOUN + -ed form," moreover, "transaction" does not collocate with "occur." Please try using "completed" or "concluded", i.e. to have two transactions concluded or completed. To avoid repetition of the said transactions, try using "them" or "those transactions."Read More...
Last Reply By f6pafd · First Unread Post

for both of us

a. You are killing a cash cow for both of us. b. You are killing what is a cash cow for both of us. Are both of the above sentences grammatical and meaningful? My problem in (a) is that it seems to be saying that you are doing the killing for both of us. "For both of us" seems to be adverbial. It seems to modify "are killing". Could it be adjectival and modify "a cash cow"? Many thanks.Read More...
Sentences a) is more likely construed as "you are doing the killing for both of us than "you are killing something that is a cash cow for both of us." Sentence 2) There is no ambiguity about "You are killing what is a cash cow for both of us," which is equivalent to "you are killing THAT WHICH is a cash cow for both of us," and "Which is a cash cow for both of us" serves as a postmodifier to "that."Read More...
Last Reply By f6pafd · First Unread Post

Keep or cut the bold? (Not sure what purpose the bold serves.)

And there’s also another tradeoff, since the conditions and methods involved in raising, transporting, and killing the poultry and fish are even worse than those involved in raising cattle.Read More...
Thanks! I'll eliminate it...it's meant to be generic like "cattle".Read More...
Last Reply By Andrew Van Wagner · First Unread Post

the applied discount or an applied discount

Should I use "the applied discount" or "an applied discount" in the sentence below? The estimated fee schedule for the completion of the work as outlined above is $1,000 (New starter package and after an applied discount ).Read More...
Hi, Tony, It all depends on whether the discount has been mentioned before or not. 1. The estimated fee schedule for the completion of the work as outlined above is $1,000 (new starter package and after an applied discount = after the application of a discount, after a discount has been applied ). (First time a discount is mentioned.) 2. The estimated fee schedule for the completion of the work as outlined above is $1,000 (new starter package and after the applied discount = after the...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

English past future conditional

Not sure if the title is a valid description for the form I have in mind here. I'm referring to a construction such as: "When I spoke to her, XY said that there was a chance her husband may be posted to a new city within the next year." Does "may be" seem correct here? Or "might have been"? Also, what would one call this grammatical form? (Some context: Writer is reporting results of interviews carried out with research participants (in the past). Participants discuss possible eventualities,...Read More...
Thanks, Gustavo, that's a great help!Read More...
Last Reply By mrsprings · First Unread Post

Is this construction OK?

There's a ubiquitous construction where you have something that's technically syntactically ambiguous: My goal is to deal with common confusions and questions. You probably see this construction 100 times a day: [adjective] [noun] + [noun] The issue is that the adjective might apply just to the first noun or maybe to both nouns. But my guess is that in 90% (or more than 90%? like 99%? or like 99.9%?) of cases it's meant to apply to both. For one thing, you can see how semantically similar...Read More...
Thank you for providing alternative expressions, so that we'll be more flexible and resourceful in finding better ways of expression.Read More...
Last Reply By f6pafd · First Unread Post

Is the second sentence ambiguous?

Regarding the second sentence, the issue is whether "Don't" unambiguously attaches to "try to steer their choices". Don’t infantilize people—don’t try to steer their choices. Don’t infantilize people and try to steer their choices.Read More...
Hi, David and Gustavo. Thanks a lot for your explicit explanations and analyses. I enjoy the active participation in the discussion rather than being a passive spectator.Read More...
Last Reply By f6pafd · First Unread Post

Start + to do VS start + doing

Hello, Do you agree with this statement? I found it a bit confusing. Source: https://www.ecenglish.com/learnenglish/lessons/list-verbs-take-a-gerund-or-infinitive#:%7E:text=When%20Read More...
As a matter of fact, "start" collocates with both the gerund and V-ing with no apparent difference in meaning. As to whether the action was not completed, It all depends, because there is no context given, without which no conclusion can be made.Read More...
Last Reply By f6pafd · First Unread Post

Simple grammatical error?

Hello Grammar Exchange members! I read an article in The Korea Times titled "Drying Amazon rainforest closer to 'tipping point,' scientists warn" and ran into the following sentence which I couldn't analyze its structure clearly. a. As more of the rainforest is cut down or burned and the Amazon becomes less resilient, it could reaching a tipping point where significant parts of the forest canopy are lost and become drier open savannah or shorter, drier forest, scientists warn. I think the...Read More...
Hi, Gustavo, Yes, I have thought of that, but, I think, in this case the present progressive would sound better than the present simple. - As more of the rainforest is being cut down ... Another possibility is that 'as' = 'because'.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

’It is demanded (for us) to adopt’

Hello, everyone, As far as I know, under ‘Present Subjunctive’ the verb ‘demand’ could restrictively be passivized in the meaning of ‘ask for’ as follows; 1) It is demanded that every member should inform himself on these rules. 2) It is demanded that every member inform himself on these rules. 3) It is demanded for every member to inform himself on these rules. *4) Every member is demanded to inform himself on these rules. (wrong) If my assumptions above is correct, the sentence below could...Read More...
Hi, David, really appreciate yours.Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

prepositional phrase

Hello moderators. ''Ukraine's Emergency Ministry reported several S-300 missiles had fallen in and around Zaporizhzhia, with one destroying a residential building in a suburb.'' In this sentence, what is the grammar structure after comma ''...., with one destroying...''? We can reduce adverbial clause via ''with'' when the subject are not same. For example. ‘’ The day was a great success because the team won 3 bronze medals and 5 certificates of merit. = The day was a great success with the...Read More...
Hello, Gustavo, Thank you very much for the explanation indeed. I appreciate you. I really didn't find this information in grammar books and websites. Best regards.Read More...
Last Reply By Erdal K. · First Unread Post

I tried to do it VS I try to do it

Hello, What's the difference between (1) and (2)? (1) I tried to do it. (2) I try to do it. 🤔 This is what I think. Am I right? (1) It's about something done in the past that I've tried to do but without succeeding in it. ( more pessimistic). (2) Something that is occurring in the present/future that isn't necessarily unsuccessful. But I'll make more effort to do it because it's difficult. ( relatively to sentence (1), it's more optimistic)Read More...
Thank youRead More...
Last Reply By Meriem · First Unread Post

Initially he did not want to catch the wind of having someone known his pathetic conditions.

Dear Sir I just wrote down a small half-cooked story to brush up my language. I just want to know if there is any grammar mistake in the underlined sentence? "I don’t have any close friends who go up and beyond when it required. To be honest I have helped quite a few people in my life when they were in need of hour. I am getting kick out of helping others. I strongly believe in an old saying that what goes around comes around. I will tell you one of my experiences in a nutshell. All the way...Read More...

anyone in this office

a. Anyone in this office lives on their wits. Is (a) grammatically correct? The sentence is by David Mamet. It is from the play Glengarry Glen Ross . Source: https://www.google.com/books/edition/Glengarry_Glen_Ross/IGw9BAAAQBAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=%22anyone+in+this+office+lives+on+%22&pg=PT60&printsec=frontcover The way 'anyone' is used in that sentence sounds a bit 'off' to me. In the movie version Pacino says: Anyone in this office lives on his wits. Roma rips into Williamson –...Read More...
Hi, Azz—Yes, that sentence is grammatically correct, even if it is a bit anomalous with respect to the advice generally dispensed about "anyone." "In this office" functions as a reduced relative clause within the noun phrase headed by "anyone." The sentence has conditional meaning: Anyone who is in this office lives on their/his wits. (= If someone is in this office, he lives on his wits.) The English in Glengarry Glen-Ross , though rough, is darn near flawless, I'd say. It features four or...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Past perfect or past perfect continuous

When I phoned him ,he ( had written- had been writing ) letters to 6 of his friends for hours. I see the answer should be ( had been writing ) because he didn't mention the number of letters Thanks in advance ☺️Read More...
Yes, Treasure, the answer is "had been writing," but not because it doesn't mention the number of letters. It's because of the adverbial "for hours." Without that, the sentence would be fine, but with a different meaning: When I phoned him, he had written letters to 6 of his friends. That sentence does not indicate that the writing continued up till the time of the speakers phoning him. It is compatible with that being the case, but it is also compatible with the writing having occurred well...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

had studied, had been studying

Hello Moderators. Could you please help me? Which form is correct? Why - He (had studied, had been studying) French for 3 years at secondary school before he graduated from Cairo University. Thank you.Read More...
Hello, Ahmed Imam Attia—The sentence makes no sense with either answer. Don't you mean to say "before he entered Cairo University"? Students don't go straight from high school (secondary school) to graduating from college! They graduate from secondary school, attend college, then graduate from college.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Future perfect or Future continuous

Choose It's expected that man........on several planets by the end of this century. A. will have landed B. will be landing I think both are correctRead More...
Hello, Treasure—"Will be landing" suggests repeated future landings. Compare: "People will soon be landing on those islands in airplanes." While possible, that meaning is highly unlikely, as the speaker of such a sentence would surely mean to refer to a future achievement of mankind. Surely the speaker means that, by century's end, it will be true that we have landed on several planets.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Try + V-ing or infinitive?

Hello GE community, Why should we use To avoid and not Avoiding in the following sentence: (1) Do you ever try to avoid having your photo taken? when? why? 🤔 Is it because of "When? Why?" ( which means a specific situation that happened in the past and not in general )? In case of a general situation, could we say: (2) Do you ever try avoiding having your photo taken?Read More...
Yes, it's a bit misleading. Thank you DavidRead More...
Last Reply By Meriem · First Unread Post
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