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November 2020

demonstrative pronoun vs relative pronoun

Hello I wonder if the word "that" is used as a demonstrative pronoun or relative pronoun. I am very confused because of the commar used in front of "that". I learned that "that" is not used with undefined relative pronoun with "comma" before it. So would it be possible for me to understandt "that" is a demonstrative pronoun despite the usage of error of comma. I chose this sentence from LOCNESS learner corpus by native students. "Boxing is a high risk, short term career the men who do it are...Read More...
I agree with Ahmed on all counts. "That is why" should be preceded by a period, a semicolon, a colon, an em dash, or a linker, that is, something that sets it off as a separate sentence. Only "which is why" can be preceded by a comma as it introduces a sentential relative clause. I would hyphenate the compound adjectives. I also find the "the men who do it are aware of it" part defective, so the sentence as a whole should be recast: - Boxing is a high-risk, short-term career, and the men who...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

As-clause, as a modifier

- Supermarket shelves stripped bare by stockpilers were familiar scenes as anxious shoppers loaded up withtoilet rolls and pasta when lockdowns were first imposed. (From The Economist). It feels to me that "as" Introduce a relative clause modifying "familiar scenes". But I'm not sure because I only know about "the same as" pattern. Is that really a modifier? Thanks.Read More...
Hi, Robby Zhu, No, "as anxious shoppers loaded up with toilet rolls and pasta when lockdowns were first imposed" is an adverbial clause of time indicating when those scenes (of supermarket shelves being emptied by stockpilers) were familiar. The clause in turn contains another adverbial clause indicating when shoppers purchased those goods ("when lockdowns were first imposed").Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

grammar question

With no clear indication from online searches, I'm seeking consensus opinion on the grammatically correct way to structure this sentence. Grateful for any assistance: For centuries, women have styled their hair in all manner of fashion . For centuries, women have styled their hair in all manner of fashions . For centuries, women have styled their hair in all manners of fashion .Read More...
Thank you Gustavo. I really appreciate such a prompt and helpful reply to my question. I'm happy to have found this forum.Read More...
Last Reply By Curator in California · First Unread Post

Tip To Help/That Will Help Waitress Change Her Life

The headline of Floyd Mayweather tipped waitress $10,000 to help change her life - but wanted nobody to know says: 1) Floyd Mayweather’s secret $10,000 tip to help waitress change her life . a) Is the underlined portion above equivalent to the following? Floyd Mayweather’s secret $10,000 tip in order to help waitress change her life . where the underlined part is modifying the noun "tip" adjectivally. b) Can sentence (1) be written like this as well? Floyd Mayweather’s secret $10,000 tip for...Read More...
Hi, Language Learner, The constructions "in order to" + infinitive and "for" + V-ing are equivalent, and so are your sentences under (a) and (b) above. Both indicate purpose. However, in headlines "to" is usually used to introduce a future event, being similar to "due to" or "bound to," and this might be the case with this headline, the idea being that the tip will help the waitress change her life.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

It is ... to infinitive

Hi, this is my first post. I know that "It is fun to play tennis" is more preferred than 'To pay tennis is fun', but wonder if there is any difference in the meanings or nuances. Thank you!Read More...
Hello, David. Thank you very much for explaining it, and sorry for my typo mistake!Read More...
Last Reply By Reo · First Unread Post

since + present perfect

I have come across this sentence: 1 With this new job, since I've been in charge of the sales department, I've been working long hours and working at the weekend. Is this sentence grammatically correct? Wouldn't it be better to use the past simple instead? 2 With this new job, since I came to be in charge of the sales department, I've been working long hours and working at the weekend.Read More...
Hi, Me_IV, Both sentences are correct. While (1) focuses on the position you have held all this time, (2) takes as a point of reference the moment when you were appointed to do that job.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Determiners

( All / Each / Every / Both ) of the musical band is wearing a hat.Read More...
Hello, Islam Mohamed, Where have you taken this from? None of the possible combinations works. You could say: - All in the musical band are wearing a hat. - Everyone in the musical band is wearing a hat. - All the members of the musical band are wearing a hat. - Each / Every member of the musical band is wearing a hat. - Both members of the musical band are wearing a hat.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Activity centers?

A park has a garden, playground, theater, gymnasium and science center. Can they be called 'activity centers?'Read More...

Tenses

Hi there, as a stand alone sentence, which one do you think is correct? 1- I worked for this company before but now I work for another company. 2- I have worked for this company before but now I work for another company. 3- I used to work for this company but now I work for another company.Read More...
All three are correct, Subhajit, but you should consider using a comma before "but," a coordinating conjunction that here separates two independent clauses.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Teach students like a flock of sheep?

I was asked to talk about some mistakes Teachers make that make them less effective. While answering I said: "Teachers often fail to acknowledge the unique needs of each and every student. As if he's the shepherd and the students are his flock of sheep." Is it possible to say this or 'teach students like a flock of sheep' to mean that teachers treat students as if they all have the same capacity?Read More...
@Ashraful Haque Hello... Well, first of all, NOT every student can have the SAME capacity...I really don't know what kind of examples do you have in mind, but how about the following sayings (which I quite often use myself): “The more I learn, the more I realize how much I don't know" (Einstein). "I know that I know nothing" (Socrates).Read More...
Last Reply By Peace · First Unread Post

Tense with 'in the past'

What tense should I use with in the past ? 1- In the past, I worked for this company but now I work In another company. 2- In the past, I have worked for this company but now I work In another company.Read More...
Hi, Subhajit—The past tense works better there, but the present perfect is possible. Specific past-time adverbials don't work with the present perfect. However, "in the past" is generic enough that it is not unacceptable.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

first conditional

Hello friends, Does anyone have an intuitive explanation for why the present tense is used in the first conditional? Thanks in advanceRead More...
Hi, Ben, You should provide examples. The present tense can refer to the present or the future time. - If you study (present), you will pass the exam. - If you see her (future), tell her I'm back.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

might want/need to

1) You might want to consider quitting your barista job. 2) You might want to spend more time studying and less time playing video games. Q1): I know "you might want to ..." means "I suggest/recommend ...". Do we use "you might need to ..." to mean the same thing too? Q2): Can I use sentence (2), or rather "you might want to ...", in a different context where the speaker is not sure whether "you" intend to do the thing mentioned, and therefore just guessing " maybe you want to do X or maybe...Read More...

Purpose or result?

I found this sentence in the Oxford Guide to English Grammar, Ch. 14, p.144 I hope to see you again soon. Some infinitives express purpose (I went there to cure my condition), others result, (I came home (only) to find a gang of thugs on my doorstep). Is there a name for the type of infinitive in the above example with hope?Read More...
Thanks very much DavidRead More...
Last Reply By lagrange · First Unread Post

The use of 'are' followed by of

I found a sentence like this: These benefits are of important values. I was wondering why there should be 'of' after are?Read More...
Hi, Diana—Is the Ph.D. student who wrote this a nonnative speaker of English? The opening coordinate structure ("the positive externalities and non-financial") does not work: we don't coordinate noun phrases with adjectives (e.g., " the apple and yellow "). Also, I'm not sure what "at their consideration" is supposed to mean. Does "their" refer to "students and institutions"? In any case, despite the fact that seeing the whole sentence gives me little idea as to what the author is trying to...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

-ed ending

As far as I understood, the -ed ending is primarily used to put a verb into the past tense, or to make a past participle. Of course, the past participle can also be used as an adjective. But what is the explanation for -ed endings in adjectives such as open-mouthed, or big-bellied, which are not derived from verbs?Read More...
Thanks GustavoRead More...
Last Reply By lagrange · First Unread Post

Adjective or Complement? I am not sure

Words which are grammatically categorised as adjective in a given sentence, also are found working as complement . Please look at the sentence below- John is good . If it's asked- what is the function of 'good’ in the sentence above ? May I say, it's an adjective or I should rather say, ‘good’ is a complement, more specifically subjective complement ?Read More...
Hello, Narayan, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. In the sentence, "John is good," "good" is both an adjective and a subject complement. Adjective is its part of speech; subject complement is its syntactic function in that sentence. Do you know what a subject(ive) complement is?Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Synonym

Why did companies like Microsoft, Apple, and Google find success, whilst so many others disappeared? There is no concise answer, but one interesting coincidence is that many of them were started by two or more entrepreneurs working in conjunction with each other. At Microsoft, Bill Gates and Paul Allen complemented each other; Apple had Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak; and we owe Google to the rapport between founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin. Is rapport closer in meaning to intimate...Read More...
Did you write this passage, Hendrix Le? If not, where have you taken it from, and why haven't you used quotation marks to show they are not your words?Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Literary devices

Hi!. This forum may not be the right place to ask this question since it is not a grammar question but rather a question about literary devices. Feel free to remove/delete my question if you feel that it is not suitable for this forum. What I am wondering about is the use of anaphora and tricolon, and whether a part of sentence can be both an anaphora and a tricolon or not. The following can be found in one of the texts my students have worked with: “we defend the man in the street, the...Read More...
Hello, EngTeach, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Torgeir, we only delete questions that are offensive, or that disrupt the natural course of our forum exchanges (e.g. unsolicited advertising). I had never heard about tricolon , but it seems to me that it will tend to include the anaphoric device of repeating the same word at the beginning of each phrase or clause: In grammar, we generally speak about "parallelism," which is what I notice above — according to the definition I found, this...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post
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